FLOSS Project Planets

Code Drop: GovCMS: What Drupal developers can look forward to in 2015

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2015-02-27 23:49

At Code Drop we are looking forward to leveraging all of the incredible effort which has gone into the govCMS ecosystem and all which as gone into making Drupal the choice for Government organisations. Developers who work with or are hoping to work with the platform have a lot of stuff to look forward to in 2015.

Planned Features

While govCMS is the name for the overarching project to bring Drupal into government using turnkey solutions, it is powered by the Drupal distribution aGov. Part of the recent work that has gone into the platform is a planned set of features for a new version of aGov (7.x-3.x). These planned features have been posted on Drupal.org and do represent a really positive evolution in the profile, a quick summary of which can be found below.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, February 2015

Planet Debian - Fri, 2015-02-27 21:05

This was my third month working on Debian LTS, and the first where I actually uploaded packages. I also worked on userland packages for the first time.

In the middle of February I finished and uploaded a security update for the kernel package (linux-2.6 version 2.6.32-48squeeze11, DLA 155-1). I decided not to include the fix for CVE-2014-9419 and the large FPU/MMX/SSE/AVX state management changes it depends on, as they don't seem to be worth the risk.

The old patch system used in linux-2.6 in squeeze still frustrates me, but I committed a script in the kernel subversion repository to simplify adding patches to it. This might be useful to any other LTS team members working on it.

In the past week I uploaded security updates for cups (version 1.4.4-7+squeeze7, DLA 159-1) and sudo (1.7.4p4-2.squeeze.5, DLA 160-1). My work on the cups package was slowed down by its reliance on dpatch, which thankfully has been replaced in later versions. sudo is a more modern quilt/debhelper package, but upstream has an odd way of building manual pages. In the version used in squeeze the master format is Perl POD, while in wheezy it's mandoc, but in both cases the upstream source includes pre-generated manual pages and doesn't rebuild them by default. debian/rules is supposed to fix this but doesn't (#779363), so I had to regenerate 'by hand' and fold the changes into the respective patches.

Finally, I started work on addressing the many remaining security issues in eglibc. Most of the patches applied to wheezy were usable with minimal adjustment, but I didn't have time left to perform any meaningful testing. I intend to upload what I've done to people.debian.org for testing by interested parties and then make an upload early in March (or let someone else on the LTS or glibc team do so).

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Drupal Association News: Drupal Association Board Meeting: 18 February, 2015

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2015-02-27 19:17

February may be the shortest month of the year, but it's certainly been one of the busiest for the Drupal Association, so I apologize for taking more than a week to get this summary post up! What's been keeping us so busy? Our first ever DrupalCon in Latin America and the Drupal Association At-Large Board elections. Both of these events have been huge positive milestones for the Association, and have involved dozens of volunteers from around the globe. In the middle of all that, we managed to sneak in a board meeting on 18 February. If you missed it, you can listen to the recording, read the notes, and peruse the materials. Or feel free to skim this summary!

Operational Update
  • We have a big initiative internally at the Association to reevaluate the metrics we use to illustrate the success of our work. We are also looking at ways to better display these metrics so that you can see more context. So over the next few months, you'll see the metrics in the dashboared shift and change. Just a bit of a heads up, and let us know if you have any feedback along the way.
  • The February board packet covered our January metrics, and things look pretty good one month into the year. We are especially pleased that the Engineering team has been able to bring site performance to our goal levels. 
  • The Engineering Team also took several big steps towards key areas of the Drupal.org roadmap in January. Step 1 of the roadmap is better Account Creation and Login, and several key issues were closed out.
  • The DrupalCon Team and Engineering worked together to launch events.drupal.org in January as well. This shift means that Con sites are all on the same platform now. We no longer have to launch a site from scratch for each Con, which helps make Cons much easier to manage. Most importantly, we've been able to introduce key new features in reegistration for our community. Excited? Go ahead and register now! You can check out the new features yourself!
  • We are really lucky to work with the tireless Drupal 8 Branch Maintainers on the Drupal 8 Accelerate program. The program is picking up steam with a number of grants made and completed already. The next big grant will fund a Drupal CI (testbot) srpint in Portland at the end of March.
Content Strategy Update

Last year, the Content Working Group began a process of building a larger strategy for a reimagination of Drupal.org. Our first work was focused on User Research, and completed that work in the fall, publishing the developed personas. The next phase has focused on developing a content strategy. With over 1.2 MILLION pieces of content on Drupal.org, a strategy for dealing with that content is going to be pretty darn important. You can check out the presentation, as well as the post that's currently one of those pieces of content on Drupal.org.

Drupal.org Advertising Strategy

Finding new revenue streams is vitally important to the Association. For the entire history of the Drupal Association, DrupalCons have been the primary way we have funded other community work. We want to do more to serve our mission: uniting a global open source community to build and promote Drupal. If we're going to do that, we need new revenue streams. The bonus? If we can find new funding sources, it takes the pressure off of DrupalCons to perform financially, which means we can make choices for those events that might not fuel the financial bottom line, but make the events better for the community. 

So how are we doing it? New programs like Drupal Jobs have launched. We are also introducing advertising on Drupal.org and to Drupal.org visitors. We working to develop advertising products that are meaningful for advertisers (enough traffic, good clicks) and also deliver value to our community. We've drawn a few clear lines - we won't advertise on issue queues, for example, and will focus on users who are not logged into the site. We'll also be developing a variety of programs so that small shops can participate alongside bigger firms. 

For all the details, check out the presentation.

The End

Thanks so much for checking in on this board meeting and, as always, please let me know if you have any questions or thoughts.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Matthew Rocklin: Ising models and Numba

Planet Python - Fri, 2015-02-27 19:00

This work is supported by Continuum Analytics and the XDATA Grant as part of the Blaze Project

tl;dr I play with Numba and find it effective.

Introduction

Confession, I’ve never actually used Numba. Well that’s not quite true; I’ve indirectly used Numba thousands of times because Blaze auto-generates numba ufuncs. Still I’ve never used it for a particular problem. I usually define problems with large array operations and compile those down. Numba takes a different approach and translates Python for loops to efficient LLVM code. This is all lower in the hardware stack than where I usually think.

But when I was looking for applications to motivate recent work in nearest-neighbor communications in dask a friend pointed me towards the Ising model, a simple physical system that is both easy to code up and has nice macro-scale properties. I took this as an example to play with Numba. This post details my experience.

Ising Model

Disclaimer: I am not a physicist

The Ising model represents a regular grid of points where each point has two possible states, spin up and spin down. States like to have the same spin as their immediate neighbors so when a spin-down state is surrounded by more spin-up states it will switch to spin-up and vice versa. Also, due to random fluctuations, points might switch spins, even if this switch is not favorable. In pseudocode an Ising update step might look like the following

for every point in the grid: energy = my spin * sum of all of the spins (+1 or -1) of neighboring points if energy is improved by switching: switch else if we're particulalry unlucky switch anyway

For this kind of algorithm imperative for-loopy code is probably the most clear. You can do this with high-level array operations too (e.g. NumPy/Blaze/Theano), but it’s a mess.

Numba code

Here is my solution to the problem with Numba and a gif of the solution

import numba import numpy as np from math import exp, log, e, sqrt kT = 2 / log(1 + sqrt(2), e) @numba.jit(nopython=True) def _update(x, i, j): n, m = x.shape dE = 2* x[i, j] * ( x[(i-1)%n, (j-1)%m] + x[(i-1)%n, j ] + x[(i-1)%n, (j+1)%m] + x[ i , (j-1)%m] + x[ i , (j+1)%m] + x[(i+1)%n, (j-1)%m] + x[(i+1)%n, j ] + x[(i+1)%n, (j+1)%m] ) if dE <= 0 or exp(-dE / kT) > np.random.random(): x[i, j] *= -1 @numba.jit(nopython=True) def update(x): n, m = x.shape for i in range(n): for j in range(0, m, 2): # Even columns first to avoid overlap _update(x, i, j) for i in range(n): for j in range(1, m, 2): # Odd columns second to avoid overlap _update(x, i, j) if __name__ == '__main__': x = np.random.randint(2, size=(1000, 1000)).astype('i1') x[x == 0] = -1 for i in range(100): update(x)

My old beater laptop executes one update step on a 1000x1000 grid in 50ms. Without Numba this takes 12s. This wasn’t a canned demo by an expert user / numba developer; this was just my out-of-the-box experience.

Thoughts

I really like the following:

  • I can remove @numba.jit and use the Python debugger
  • I can assert that I’m only using LLVM with nopython=True
  • I can manage data with NumPy (or dask.array) separately from managing computation with Numba

I ran in to some issues and learned some things too:

  • random is only present in the developer preview builds of Numba (conda install -c numba numba). It will be officially released in the 0.18 version this March.
  • You don’t have to provide type signature strings. I tried providing these at first but I didn’t know the syntax and so repeatedly failed to write down the type signature correctly. Turns out the cost of not writing it down is that Numba will jit whenever it sees a new signature. For my application this is essentially free.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Justin Mason: Links for 2015-02-27

Planet Apache - Fri, 2015-02-27 18:58
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Bryan Pendleton: Rough news for the Derby project

Planet Apache - Fri, 2015-02-27 18:41

Nearly 20 years ago, when Java was just emerging as an exciting new programming language, a small software company named "Cloudscape" was started up to build database software in Java.

Although I never worked at Cloudscape, their offices were only a couple blocks from my office, and I knew a number of the principal engineers very well.

Cloudscape assembled a superb engineering team and built a powerful product, but struggled to find commercial success as the "Dot Com Bubble" burst around the end of the 1990's. In 1999, Cloudscape was acquired by Informix, and in 2001 Informix was acquired by IBM.

Ten years ago, in the summer of 2004, IBM contributed the code to the Apache Software Foundation as Derby.

For many years, Derby was one of the most active and most successful projects at Apache, with dozens of committers and contributors building new features and fixing bugs, and the project produced release after release after release of new software. Both IBM and Sun Microsystems made substantial commitments to the project, providing material resources such as testing labs and equipment, but more importantly employing some of the most talented engineers I've ever had the pleasure of working with, and enabling those engineers to work on Derby.

It was an open source nirvana.

But in recent years, the community has struggled.

Sun Microsystems, of course, collapsed during the Great Recession of 2008, and in 2009 was sold to Oracle Corporation. IBM remains an independent corporation but is suffering greatly as well.

The end result is that, over the last year, both Oracle and IBM have essentially halted their support of the Derby project. Certainly in both cases this was done for valid and undoubtedly necessary business reasons, but the impact on the Derby project is severe.

It's hard for a non-programmer to understand the attachment that a programmer feels to their code. It's just an inanimate thing, code, but when you spend 20 years devoting almost every waking minute to thinking about it, and concentrating on it, and giving it your best, you grow powerfully attached to that code.

I feel bad for all the friends that I've made over the years, and wish them well. Such a collection of brilliant Java programmers has rarely been assembled, and I am sure that they are all going to move on to much better and brighter prospects.

And I feel bad for the Derby project, which was, at one time, a poster child for what an open source project could be, and for what the open source development process could produce, but is now a codebase whose future, frankly, must be considered to be in doubt.

Personally, I continue to enjoy working with the Derby codebase, and it is a professional interest of mine, so I hope to remain involved with the project as long as Apache will allow it to continue.

I'm not sure why I felt the need to post this, but I didn't want Derby to just quietly fade away without somebody taking a minute to salute it, and praise it, and record what was, what is, and (perhaps) what will be.

To close, let me share what is (I think) the last picture of the remaining Derby development team, taken last fall, just around the time that the people in question were learning the fate that their corporate masters had in mind for the work they devoted the greater portion of their professional lives to.


Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

FSF Blogs: Thank you, to reddit and the reddit community!

GNU Planet! - Fri, 2015-02-27 17:35

The FSF was selected as one of the 10! We were 8th on the list, just behind National Public Radio.

We received the news while I was meeting with our awesome technical team, hammering out our priorities for the next week and discussing the details of how we'll stream the upcoming LibrePlanet conference using exclusively free software. Our collective jaws dropped.

Thank you!

It is an honor to receive such a strong endorsement—and such trust—from the reddit community. It's also a responsibility, and we will use the money wisely.

As one of the smallest charities on the list, our staff of 13 works incredibly hard to win back your freedom as computer users; getting us closer to a world where all of what we need to do on all of our computers can be done, and done safely, using only free "as in freedom" software.

Since we are driven primarily by contributions from individuals (they were about 80% of the $1.02 million in support we received last fiscal year), this amount will make reddit one of our largest donors this year, right up there with TowardEX and the Markley Group, who generously donate just about all of our bandwidth and colocation space.

As this year is the FSF's 30th anniversary, we had set an ambitious goal of $525,000 for our winter fundraiser, which ended January 31st. We came up a bit shy then—but with this donation, we have actually exceeded that goal.

Thank you all for making this year extra-special for us! Now it's time to see how much more we can do for you.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Thank you, to reddit and the reddit community!

FSF Blogs - Fri, 2015-02-27 17:35

The FSF was selected as one of the 10! We were 8th on the list, just behind National Public Radio.

We received the news while I was meeting with our awesome technical team, hammering out our priorities for the next week and discussing the details of how we'll stream the upcoming LibrePlanet conference using exclusively free software. Our collective jaws dropped.

Thank you!

It is an honor to receive such a strong endorsement—and such trust—from the reddit community. It's also a responsibility, and we will use the money wisely.

As one of the smallest charities on the list, our staff of 13 works incredibly hard to win back your freedom as computer users; getting us closer to a world where all of what we need to do on all of our computers can be done, and done safely, using only free "as in freedom" software.

Since we are driven primarily by contributions from individuals (they were about 80% of the $1.02 million in support we received last fiscal year), this amount will make reddit one of our largest donors this year, right up there with TowardEX and the Markley Group, who generously donate just about all of our bandwidth and colocation space.

As this year is the FSF's 30th anniversary, we had set an ambitious goal of $525,000 for our winter fundraiser, which ended January 31st. We came up a bit shy then—but with this donation, we have actually exceeded that goal.

Thank you all for making this year extra-special for us! Now it's time to see how much more we can do for you.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Nick Kew: Saved from Visa

Planet Apache - Fri, 2015-02-27 17:32

I’ve written before about the Fraudster’s Friend misleadingly named “Verified by Visa”.  Most directly in my post Phished by Visa, though Bullied by Visa perhaps also deserves a mention.

Today I went to place an order with Argos, who I’ve used several times before and who have always – in contrast to some of their competitors – delivered very efficiently.  This time alas the shopping process has become significantly more hassle, and they’ve introduce the VBV cuckoo into the process.  But I was pleased to note that, when I came to the VBV attack, Firefox flagged it up as precisely what it is: an XSS attack, and in the context of secure data (as in creditcard numbers) a serious security issue.

I hope Firefox does that by default, rather than just with my settings.  Though it would be courageous, to take the blame from the unwashed masses who might think VBV serves their interests when it doesn’t work.  Doing the Right Thing against an enemy with ignorance on its side has a very bad history in web browsers, as Microsoft in the late 1990s killed off the opposition by exposing their users to a whole family of “viruses” in a move designed to make correct behaviour a loser in the market (specifically, violation of MIME standards documented since 1992 as security-critical).

Alas, while Firefox saved me from the evil phishing attack, the combination of that and other Argos website trouble pushed me to a thoroughly insecure and less than convenient medium: the telephone.  Bah, Humbug.


Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Victor Kane: DrupalCon Latin America 2015 Bogotá will live on as one of the classics

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2015-02-27 17:13

Grass roots enthusiasm, D8 teen spirit, much needed long absent leadership and community courage facing up to critical issues should overflow into DrupalCon Los Angeles in May

An incredible DrupalCon, DrupalCon Latin America, ended a couple weeks ago and I haven't seen any cool DrupalCon wrap-ups capable of really sharing with the rest of the Drupal community what an extremely well-organized and just plain special community experience it was. I am sure I'm not the only one who felt completely invigorated by it all. Let's take a look at why, and see how we can make it contagious.

Great Venue
Attendees from all over
Quality of presentations
Drupal 8 properly positioned
Now we know when to start switching to D8
Much Needed Drupal leadership
Huge participation in the Sprints and beyond

read more

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

X-Team: Install Drush 7 for Drupal 8 without throwing away Drush 6

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2015-02-27 16:43

If you are playing around with Drupal 8, you may want to install version 7 of Drush on your computer. However, Drush 7 is currently only available as the master branch at github, and you may not like to throw out your existing Drush 6 in favor of the Drush development version, which is not...

The post Install Drush 7 for Drupal 8 without throwing away Drush 6 appeared first on X-Team.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Wuinfo: Design a Drupal Website with a Million Nodes in Mind

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2015-02-27 16:10

Begin to design a Drupal website with a million nodes in mind. We build a Drupal website. It runs well at beginning. Until one day, the system has hundreds of thousands of node. We found the site became slow. We need wait many seconds before we can open a new page. Not only it is slow, but also sometimes we got errors like memory exhausted.

Most time the problem was existed at the beginning stage of a system. When designing a site, there are something we as a developer have to take care. We need bear in mind the site will grow and more and more nodes will come. Everytimes creating a function, we need to make sure the function will work fine when there are hundreds of thousands of nodes in the system. Otherwise, those functions may time out or finish all the memory by those ever increasing nodes in the system.

PHP have a maximum memory limit for each user. Sometimes it is 128 MB. Sometimes it is 256MB. The number is limited, and it is not infinite large for sure. There is no limit on how many nodes can exist on our website. As our system getting larger and larger with more nodes created, we will face the memory limitation sooner or later if we did not take it into consideration at the beginning.

Here is a quick sample. Drupal have a function node_load_multiple(). This function can load all nodes in the database to memory. Here are some codes from one of our contributed module.

foreach (node_load_multiple(FALSE) as $node) {
// Modify node objects to be consistent with Revisioning being
// uninstalled, before updating the {taxonomy_index} table accordingly.
unset($node->revision_moderation);
revisioning_update_taxonomy_index($node, FALSE);
}

This code is in an implementation of hook_uninstall. It will run into a problem if there are over 10,000 nodes in the system. As a result, we can not uninstall this module. Here is the error message:

Fatal error: Allowed memory size of 268435456 bytes exhausted (tried to allocate 36 bytes) in ...

It used up all 256MB memory before it can load all the nodes. As the result, the module can never be uninstalled from the site.

It is an extreme case. As we troubleshooting an existing site, we may notice similar case here and there. I also notice that we can do something on the field_sql_storage module to make Drupal running faster and keep SQL database smaller.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Qactus is out in the wild

Planet KDE - Fri, 2015-02-27 15:18

Qactus, a Qt-based OBS notifier, is out in the wild. Version 0.4.0 is the first release.
I started it a long time ago together with Sivan Greenberg as a personal project for learning Qt. And now it’s back into life

It features
– Build status viewer
– Row editor with autocompleter for project, package, repository and arch
– Submit requests viewer
– Bugs

This application is possible thanks to Marcus ‘darix’ Rueckert. He has helped me getting further knowledge of the OBS API.

I think this version is usable. So, why don’t you give it a try?
The source code is hosted on GitHub.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

PyCharm: PyCharm 4.0.5 RC is available

Planet Python - Fri, 2015-02-27 14:34

We are happy to announce the availability of PyCharm 4.0.5 Release Candidate. Since the previous bug-fix update in early January we’ve gathered a lot of fixes for different PyCharm’s subsystems. Actually we’re almost ready to release them to you as PyCharm 4.0.5, but before we do that, we’d like to make sure that this build doesn’t hide any surprises. That’s why we’re releasing PyCharm 4.0.5 RC today.

Installers for PyCharm 4.0.5 RC (build 139.1485) can be found on Early Access Preview page.

The complete list of changes is in the PyCharm 4.0.5 RC release notes. The most notable among them are: a critical fix for broken code insight for PyPy, a couple of fixes for unresolved NumPy functions, and a few important fixes for Django 1.7 support.

Patch updates from the previous versions should be available soon. Just make sure you’ve enabled the “Early Access Preview” update channel in your update settings. In case you want to keep your current PyCharm installation untouched but still want to try the new RC version, please don’t use the patch update – install the new version alongside from scratch instead.

We hope there’ll be no major bugs in this build and we’ll be able to give it a green light as PyCharm 4.0.5 within the next week.

As always, please report any problem you found to our public issue tracker. By doing so you help us make PyCharm better.

Follow us on twitter to receive our latest news.

Develop with Pleasure!
-PyCharm team

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

PyCharm: Feature Spotlight: Find Usages &amp; Locate Duplicates in Python Code

Planet Python - Fri, 2015-02-27 13:28

Happy Friday everyone,

In the last week’s blog post I covered different refactoring capabilities of PyCharm. Today I’ll continue highlighting different handy features and show you some more tools that help you keep your code under full control.

One of the features that every developer uses on the daily basis is Find/Replace. It’s supported in every code editor, and PyCharm is no exception: Ctrl+F/Ctrl+R. Besides, PyCharm supports a number of subsidiary functions, such as Find Next/Previous Occurrence, Find/Replace in Path, Select all Occurrences, etc. They all are available under the Edit | Find menu item:

While some of these features are pretty common, others really stand apart thanks to PyCharm outstanding code intelligence. Find usages is one of such noticeably smart features that deserves a closer look.

1. Find usages
Just press Alt + F7 on any symbol at the caret ( no matter if the symbol is a class, method, field, parameter, or another statement) and get a list of references grouped by type of usage, module and file. This feature is really fast and gets you first results almost instantly. More results appear as the IDE finds them:

By default the results should be grouped by usage type, if not you can enable this by pressing Ctrl(Cmd for Mac) + Alt + T or by clicking the corresponding button on the sidebar:

2. Settings
If you want to set custom options for the Find Usages algorithm, you can use Shift + Alt + Ctrl + 7 (Shift + Alt + Cmd + 7 for Mac):

3. Quickpopup
To see the results quickly in place, simply press Alt + Ctrl + 7 (Alt + Cmd + 7 for Mac):


4. Highlight overridden methods
Another useful aspect of highlighting usages in PyCharm is that you can easily find the methods that are overridden for a particular class. Just put the caret at the statement and press Shift + Ctrl + F7 (Shift + Cmd + F7 for Mac). If there are multiple classes, you will be asked whose methods to highlight:


5. Highlight usages in File
Sometimes its useful to quickly see all usages of the variable or method within a file right in the editor. Highlight usages in File (Ctrl + Shift + F7) works perfect in this case:

Locate Duplicates

It’s not a secret that one of the most annoying problem of every project is duplicated code. Obviously any developer tries to get rid of such redundancies. Thanks to PyCharm code intelligence, Locate duplicates tool allows you to examine your code and find different code duplicates. This tool works for different languages and is highly configurable.
To use this tool go to Code | Locate Duplicates. It will ask you for an analysis scope specification:

then you can specify some other options before give it a go:

You can set supported languages that will be analysed within your scope as well as other configurable options for fine tuning the analysis.

On the last step after clicking OK, it will show you the list of code duplicates found, as well as the tool to review these duplicates and navigate between them:

After finding duplicates you might want to use one of the refactoring features described in my previous blog post in order to get rid of them.

I hope I’ve been helpful and shed some light on these advanced PyCharm search features.

Have a great weekend and see you next week!
-Dmitry

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

FSF Blogs: One month until LibrePlanet! Pre-order t-shirts through March 9th.

GNU Planet! - Fri, 2015-02-27 12:55

Register now to join the free software community at LibrePlanet 2015.

If you register by Monday, March 9th, you'll be able to pick up a spiffy LibrePlanet 2015 t-shirt. And don't forget that FSF members get gratis admission—and help support free software year-round!

Read on if you'd like more information about volunteering, child care reimbursements, the program, the LibrePlanet email discussion list, or participating remotely.

Volunteering (get gratis admission!)

Volunteers are crucial to LibrePlanet, and we need more to make this year awesome. Give two hours or more of your time and you'll get gratis admission, a LibrePlanet t-shirt, and lunch. You'll choose from a wide variety of tasks including A/V and livestreaming management, visitor services, and speaker support. Get started by telling us your skills and interests through the quick volunteer application.

Child care reimbursements

We're happy to offer childcare reimbursements, so that you can come to LibrePlanet even if you've got young hackers at home. To apply or find out more, contact campaigns@fsf.org no later than Friday, March 6th.

Program

The program is up, so you can start thinking about which sessions you'd like to attend. This year's conference will be jam packed with great talks like "Fighting surveillance with a free, distributed, and federated net," "Style or substance? Free software is totally the 80's," and "Free software at the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences." Make sure you check out the social events, including the Friday night 30th Anniversary Open House—check the website for more details.

LibrePlanet starts on the list

Looking to coordinate travel with other LibrePlanet attendees? Brainstorm ideas for lightning talks? Organize a get-together after the conference? Join the libreplanet-discuss email list to connect with other LibrePlanet attendees. The list is active year-round as part of the libreplanet.org community.

Participating remotely

Even if you can't make it to Cambridge, you can still participate in LibrePlanet! We'll be livestreaming the conference and hosting an online discussion in real time, then posting all the session recordings online after the conference. Bookmark the remote participation page now: libreplanet.org/2015/live.

That's all for now! Hope to see you at LibrePlanet.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

One month until LibrePlanet! Pre-order t-shirts through March 9th.

FSF Blogs - Fri, 2015-02-27 12:55

Register now to join the free software community at LibrePlanet 2015.

If you register by Monday, March 9th, you'll be able to pick up a spiffy LibrePlanet 2015 t-shirt. And don't forget that FSF members get gratis admission—and help support free software year-round!

Read on if you'd like more information about volunteering, child care reimbursements, the program, the LibrePlanet email discussion list, or participating remotely.

Volunteering (get gratis admission!)

Volunteers are crucial to LibrePlanet, and we need more to make this year awesome. Give two hours or more of your time and you'll get gratis admission, a LibrePlanet t-shirt, and lunch. You'll choose from a wide variety of tasks including A/V and livestreaming management, visitor services, and speaker support. Get started by telling us your skills and interests through the quick volunteer application.

Child care reimbursements

We're happy to offer childcare reimbursements, so that you can come to LibrePlanet even if you've got young hackers at home. To apply or find out more, contact campaigns@fsf.org no later than Friday, March 6th.

Program

The program is up, so you can start thinking about which sessions you'd like to attend. This year's conference will be jam packed with great talks like "Fighting surveillance with a free, distributed, and federated net," "Style or substance? Free software is totally the 80's," and "Free software at the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences." Make sure you check out the social events, including the Friday night 30th Anniversary Open House—check the website for more details.

LibrePlanet starts on the list

Looking to coordinate travel with other LibrePlanet attendees? Brainstorm ideas for lightning talks? Organize a get-together after the conference? Join the libreplanet-discuss email list to connect with other LibrePlanet attendees. The list is active year-round as part of the libreplanet.org community.

Participating remotely

Even if you can't make it to Cambridge, you can still participate in LibrePlanet! We'll be livestreaming the conference and hosting an online discussion in real time, then posting all the session recordings online after the conference. Bookmark the remote participation page now: libreplanet.org/2015/live.

That's all for now! Hope to see you at LibrePlanet.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

LAX, SCALE, KDE, SUSE, GNOME and ownCloud

Planet KDE - Fri, 2015-02-27 11:46
Lobby of the venueBack home. Tired and jetlaggy, but satisfied: SCALE rocked!
SCALE loves ownCloudThe 13th South California Linux Expo was awesome! It is the biggest LinuxFest in the USA. While decidedly different in nature from Europe's biggest Linux event that that took place just three weeks prior (FOSDEM), we met similarly enthusiastic existing and future users. Conversations were also similar: about half the visitors already knew ownCloud, often using it or planning on deploying it; and the other half was more than a little delighted to hear about it, often exclaiming they had been looking for 'something like that' for a while. Negativity was extremely rare: I don't recall a single negative comment at SCALE (merely a few people who liked ownCloud but had no use for it personally), FOSDEM had one conversation starting unpleasantly but quickly turning around - even though one feature of ownCloud wasn't up to snuff, the user was happy with the experience as a whole.
Before the action started!
For most users, ownCloud was simply a wonderful product and they used it at home, deployed it for customers or managed it in their company. Some asked what features were coming or just arrived in ownCloud 8, or asked about the state of specific features and in more than one occasion they very enthusiastically told me how excited they were about ownCloud, how they loved it and how they were telling everybody to use it!

ownCloud to-goThose who didn't know ownCloud were almost invariably surprised and excited. I can't count the times I heard "wow, why did I never hear about this before" and "dude, I've been looking for something like this for ever!". Often, people wondered how long ownCloud had been around (we just turned five), if it was open source (yes, with love), how many people contributed to it (719 and counting) and how many users it has (we guestimate over 2 million, with 500,000 in this single deployment alone). Oh, and, does it scale? The deployment linked above and a mention of users like CERN can put most concerns to rest. Yes, ownCloud scales from Raspberry Pi to Atom Smashing size.

What came up a few times as barriers to their future usage of ownCloud was pretty much what I discussed before. Running a server at home is not easy and I walked by the EFF booth to ask about progress on Let's Encrypt to ask about the progress of solving one aspect of that problem: more easily getting SSL certificates. I was told the project is on track for the 2nd half of this year.
Frank and Bryan Lunduke
It is wonderful to have such energizing, positive, enthusiastic users - and to have such an enthusiastic booth crew to talk to them as well. At the booth we had Frank, Matt, Ron, Camila and myself. Awesome it was and we had great fun! Below a timelapse video of Saturday morning. It was still rather quiet but it is nice to see us jump around!



Stuff and talkJust like at FOSDEM, we brought ownCloud stickers, hand outs explaining ownCloud to users and developers as well as some posters for the booth and pins to give out. This was all very much appreciated - I estimate we gave out about 400 hand outs and 500 or so stickers as well as about 50-100 pins.

Sunday at 3PM, I gave a talk about Privacy and ownCloud, with Frank finishing off with a section about his talk at MIT where he discussed ownCloud's Federated Cloud sharing feature and where it is going. The talk was well received; I think the angle I took to privacy (inspired by my background in psychology) spoke to the audience and Frank's description of federation and how it's done in ownCloud was very interesting. owncloud.org and owncloud.com will feature blogs with some more information about this soon.

FriendsBig, big booth!I also walked by the booths of 'old friends' - the openSUSE/GNOME/KDE crew in particular, it was awesome to meet them. Some I hadn't seen in years, others I met for the first time. They did an amazing job and richly deserve the reward they earned for most Stunningly Amazing Booth Crew (don't know the real name of the booth award but that's what it should be). If you think that 'just' GNOME an KDE being incorporated in the openSUSE booth isn't enough - Master Planner of the Booths Drew aims to bring in Enlightenment and XFCE as well next year. Supposedly a Trello board has been set up already. I bet it won't be long before it has grown to the point where the SCALE organization needs to give the 'openSUSE booth & friends' a separate hall at SCALE...

I have to note that it was thanks to our green friends that I could hang up the ownCloud flyers - they lend me some (green!) tape to do that.

The KDE booth had a bunch of terribly cool stickers (I only now realize I forgot to get one for myself!) as well as the "frameworks 5" flyers. I could only bring, like, 5 t-shirts and a dozen old 'join-the-game' flyers so I'm glad Bert Yerke and his wife, who formed the awesome local KDE team, had created the other materials. We already discussed 2016, as they have plenty of ideas on how to improve the booth!
Awesome stickers...
If you, dear reader, want to help out at the KDE or ownCloud booth next year - let me know, either in the comments or by mail. I can promise you: it is awesomely fun and by far not as scary as you might think! Bert and Matt and everybody who has ever been at a KDE, openSUSE, ownCloud or other FOSS booth can attest to that: it is a great way of getting involved and making a big difference!

Bonus points for who finds a suitable meaning for the one item in the title which isn't yet an acrynym ;-)

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Holger Krekel: pytest development reorganization, adopt pytest month!

Planet Python - Fri, 2015-02-27 10:56

Today I went live with shifting pytest development to be more community driven. During a discussion at FOSDEM 2015 a significant subset of pytest contributors decided to create two organisations at github and bitbucket and shift core pytest and several plugins to them, on the initial suggestion of Anatoly Bubenkoff.  See the new pytest contribution page for details.  The teams currently have a dozen members and we are looking forward to integrate more contributors which all get full access and commit rights to all repositories, can push to the website and release to pypi.

Also at FOSDEM 2015, core pytest contributor Brianna Laugher suggested and started the Adopt pytest month initiative which will bring together pytest contributors, users and Open Source projects interested to use pytest in their project.  Many pytest contributors and practioners will participate which means you get excellent support for bringing your testing efforts up to speed with pytest.

The pytest team is also working towards a pytest-2.7 release, take a peak at the current changelog.  If you like to get something in, now is a good time to submit a pull request.  Or, if you are working with a company you may contract merlinux which in turns contracts contributors to quickly resolve any issues you might have or organises in-house training or consulting.  Apart from the direct benefit for your company it’s also a good way to support a sustained and ever-improving testing infrastructure commons for Python (pytest, tox, devpi projects in particular).

pytest core contributors at FOSDEM 2015 in Bruxelles, left to right:  Andreas Pelme, Floris Bruynooghe, Ronny Pfannschmidt, Brianna Laugher, Holger Krekel, Anatoly Bubenkoff


Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Richard Hartmann: Release Critical Bug report for Week 09

Planet Debian - Fri, 2015-02-27 10:40

The UDD bugs interface currently knows about the following release critical bugs:

  • In Total: 1072 (Including 181 bugs affecting key packages)
    • Affecting Jessie: 152 (key packages: 117) That's the number we need to get down to zero before the release. They can be split in two big categories:
      • Affecting Jessie and unstable: 101 (key packages: 80) Those need someone to find a fix, or to finish the work to upload a fix to unstable:
        • 23 bugs are tagged 'patch'. (key packages: 17) Please help by reviewing the patches, and (if you are a DD) by uploading them.
        • 6 bugs are marked as done, but still affect unstable. (key packages: 4) This can happen due to missing builds on some architectures, for example. Help investigate!
        • 72 bugs are neither tagged patch, nor marked done. (key packages: 59) Help make a first step towards resolution!
      • Affecting Jessie only: 51 (key packages: 37) Those are already fixed in unstable, but the fix still needs to migrate to Jessie. You can help by submitting unblock requests for fixed packages, by investigating why packages do not migrate, or by reviewing submitted unblock requests.
        • 35 bugs are in packages that are unblocked by the release team. (key packages: 27)
        • 16 bugs are in packages that are not unblocked. (key packages: 10)

How do we compare to the Squeeze and Wheezy release cycles?

Week Squeeze Wheezy Jessie 43 284 (213+71) 468 (332+136) 319 (240+79) 44 261 (201+60) 408 (265+143) 274 (224+50) 45 261 (205+56) 425 (291+134) 295 (229+66) 46 271 (200+71) 401 (258+143) 427 (313+114) 47 283 (209+74) 366 (221+145) 342 (260+82) 48 256 (177+79) 378 (230+148) 274 (189+85) 49 256 (180+76) 360 (216+155) 226 (147+79) 50 204 (148+56) 339 (195+144) ??? 51 178 (124+54) 323 (190+133) 189 (134+55) 52 115 (78+37) 289 (190+99) 147 (112+35) 1 93 (60+33) 287 (171+116) 140 (104+36) 2 82 (46+36) 271 (162+109) 157 (124+33) 3 25 (15+10) 249 (165+84) 172 (128+44) 4 14 (8+6) 244 (176+68) 187 (132+55) 5 2 (0+2) 224 (132+92) 175 (124+51) 6 release! 212 (129+83) 161 (109+52) 7 release+1 194 (128+66) 147 (106+41) 8 release+2 206 (144+62) 147 (96+51) 9 release+3 174 (105+69) 152 (101+51) 10 release+4 120 (72+48) 11 release+5 115 (74+41) 12 release+6 93 (47+46) 13 release+7 50 (24+26) 14 release+8 51 (32+19) 15 release+9 39 (32+7) 16 release+10 20 (12+8) 17 release+11 24 (19+5) 18 release+12 2 (2+0)

Graphical overview of bug stats thanks to azhag:

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets
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