FLOSS Project Planets

DrupalCon Amsterdam: Become a Mentor at DrupalCon Amsterdam

Planet Drupal - 18 hours 21 min ago

From volunteering your time at events to making a donation, there are plenty of ways to give back to the Drupal project - but by and large, one of the most important things individual Drupalers can do is donate their expertise and become a mentor.

Currently, we have only 24 mentors signed up, and we need 40 mentors to make DrupalCon Amsterdam a success. We’re anticipating several hundred individuals sign up for to join the sprint on Friday and mentorship is a great way to help people new to contributing learn Drupal and, eventually, contribute back valuable time, resources, and code to the project.

To become a mentor, click here to sign up. We need mentors for all levels of Drupal expertise, from teaching absolute Drupal beginners to assisting advanced users how to navigate the Drupal.org issue queue.

Need a ticket to attend?

There are a limited number of free DrupalCon ticket coupons available for people who sign up to mentor, and the deadline to sign up and request a ticket is Friday, 1 August. Don't miss out on an opportunity to help others and get your ticket sponsored!

We’re looking forward to the Amsterdam Mentored Code Sprint and the First-Time Sprinter Workshop. We hope that you’ll join us there!

--
Cathy Theys (YesCT)
Brian Gillbert (realityloop)
Ruben Teijeiro (rteijeiro)
DrupalCon Amsterdam Sprint Leads

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

FSF Blogs: Interview with Tox.im

GNU Planet! - Tue, 2014-07-29 20:26

In this edition, we conducted an email-based interview with David Lohle from the Tox project, an all-in-one communication platform and protocol that ensures users full privacy and secure message delivery. The Tox core library is licensed under the terms of GNU GPL version 3, or (at your option) any later version. The library implements the Tox protocol and provides an API for clients, such as Venom and Toxic.

Tell us about yourself

We're the Tox Foundation, creators of Tox, a secure and distributed multimedia messenger. Our core developer team consists of people from Canada, Germany, the US, and more. Though we speak different languages and represent diverse cultures, we are dedicated to working together on our common goal: to create a product we think is necessary in a world where our privacy is often overlooked.

What inspired you to create Tox?

After the initial leaks from Edward Snowden, we decided to take a look at what chat programs we could use that would respect our privacy. Unfortunately, at the time, all other existing implementations were either too convoluted to convince our friends to use or were proprietary, so we decided that Tox was a necessary project.

How are people using it?

Right now, people are using Tox to talk with their family in a more secure way than what other big-name, proprietary competitors offer. People from all over the world are joining group chats to talk about their favorite hobbies, and friends are getting together to discuss weekend plans. We even have plugins that allow for Tox-to-IRC and vice versa conversations. Audio calling is available in a select few clients right now, so people are even using Tox to perhaps speak with one another while they play a video game. Tox itself is a protocol, so it can be adapted to anything you can imagine. Some people have even used Tox as a file sync, safely synchronizing between their computers.

What features do you think really sets Tox apart from similar software?

Perhaps it's not so much a feature as an ideology, but Tox focuses on simplicity and security without compromise. There are a lot of great privacy-minded instant messengers out there; unfortunately, they really fall short in the user experience department. If Tox's goal is to get secure messaging in the hands of the masses, then we need to develop a set of software with a minimal learning curve. Cryptography and security are complex tasks that require special care, and Tox takes it a step further by hiding most of the configuration and other steps it usually takes to set up a competing messenger program. However, this does not mean we prevent tinkering. We're excited to see more advanced users toy around and customize Tox to their own liking, but we're also excited to see that beginners can pick up Tox and not have to sit through a video tutorial detailing how to add a friend.

When we near a finalized product, we're not going to market Tox as a secure messenger as much as we do on it's simplicity and ease. By focusing on what people care about, such as group chats and a streamlined experience, we can achieve our goal of a safe, eavesdrop-free messaging platform for all.

Why did you choose the GPLv3 as Tox's license?

When we started Tox, we wanted a platform that was easily modified, shared, and redistributed—a community is a project's strongest asset. Since most of us already supported free software, our initial discussions wavered between using a permissive license versus a strong copyleft license, and we ultimately chose GPL Version 3 in the end. Its simplicity, clarity, and strong patent protection affords our community large freedoms in changing our software, while protecting us from malicious intents.

How can users (technical or otherwise) help contribute to Tox?

We greatly appreciate all efforts, no matter how small (we're even grateful for the grammar-related commits). If you know a programming language, and wish to help develop a client, you can visit https://wiki.tox.im/Clients and see what you can offer. If you fluently speak a language other than English, and want to help translate Tox clients into other locales, browse our wiki at https://wiki.tox.im for projects you could contribute to.

We're also very interested in other's constructive criticism, as no project is ever perfect. Feedback is what fuels Tox, so if you have something to say, drop us a comment at comments@tox.im and we'll try our best to incorporate suggestions and improve from critique. Everyone can have a role in helping to push Tox forward, even if that just means telling your friends about us.

What's the next big thing for Tox?

We're currently working on implementing audio and video in all of the main Tox clients. It's a fairly momentous task, so it might take some time, but we feel it's imperative to have proper video calling in order to move forward. Due of the nature of Git and a large community, we're able to work on multiple tasks at once—group chatting, for example—but we're trying to focus most of our efforts on A/V.

Enjoyed this interview? Check out our previous entry in this series featuring Ciaran Gultnieks of F-Droid.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Interview with Tox.im

FSF Blogs - Tue, 2014-07-29 20:26

In this edition, we conducted an email-based interview with David Lohle from the Tox project, an all-in-one communication platform and protocol that ensures users full privacy and secure message delivery. The Tox core library is licensed under the terms of GNU GPL version 3, or (at your option) any later version. The library implements the Tox protocol and provides an API for clients, such as Venom and Toxic.

Tell us about yourself

We're the Tox Foundation, creators of Tox, a secure and distributed multimedia messenger. Our core developer team consists of people from Canada, Germany, the US, and more. Though we speak different languages and represent diverse cultures, we are dedicated to working together on our common goal: to create a product we think is necessary in a world where our privacy is often overlooked.

What inspired you to create Tox?

After the initial leaks from Edward Snowden, we decided to take a look at what chat programs we could use that would respect our privacy. Unfortunately, at the time, all other existing implementations were either too convoluted to convince our friends to use or were proprietary, so we decided that Tox was a necessary project.

How are people using it?

Right now, people are using Tox to talk with their family in a more secure way than what other big-name, proprietary competitors offer. People from all over the world are joining group chats to talk about their favorite hobbies, and friends are getting together to discuss weekend plans. We even have plugins that allow for Tox-to-IRC and vice versa conversations. Audio calling is available in a select few clients right now, so people are even using Tox to perhaps speak with one another while they play a video game. Tox itself is a protocol, so it can be adapted to anything you can imagine. Some people have even used Tox as a file sync, safely synchronizing between their computers.

What features do you think really sets Tox apart from similar software?

Perhaps it's not so much a feature as an ideology, but Tox focuses on simplicity and security without compromise. There are a lot of great privacy-minded instant messengers out there; unfortunately, they really fall short in the user experience department. If Tox's goal is to get secure messaging in the hands of the masses, then we need to develop a set of software with a minimal learning curve. Cryptography and security are complex tasks that require special care, and Tox takes it a step further by hiding most of the configuration and other steps it usually takes to set up a competing messenger program. However, this does not mean we prevent tinkering. We're excited to see more advanced users toy around and customize Tox to their own liking, but we're also excited to see that beginners can pick up Tox and not have to sit through a video tutorial detailing how to add a friend.

When we near a finalized product, we're not going to market Tox as a secure messenger as much as we do on it's simplicity and ease. By focusing on what people care about, such as group chats and a streamlined experience, we can achieve our goal of a safe, eavesdrop-free messaging platform for all.

Why did you choose the GPLv3 as Tox's license?

When we started Tox, we wanted a platform that was easily modified, shared, and redistributed—a community is a project's strongest asset. Since most of us already supported free software, our initial discussions wavered between using a permissive license versus a strong copyleft license, and we ultimately chose GPL Version 3 in the end. Its simplicity, clarity, and strong patent protection affords our community large freedoms in changing our software, while protecting us from malicious intents.

How can users (technical or otherwise) help contribute to Tox?

We greatly appreciate all efforts, no matter how small (we're even grateful for the grammar-related commits). If you know a programming language, and wish to help develop a client, you can visit https://wiki.tox.im/Clients and see what you can offer. If you fluently speak a language other than English, and want to help translate Tox clients into other locales, browse our wiki at https://wiki.tox.im for projects you could contribute to.

We're also very interested in other's constructive criticism, as no project is ever perfect. Feedback is what fuels Tox, so if you have something to say, drop us a comment at comments@tox.im and we'll try our best to incorporate suggestions and improve from critique. Everyone can have a role in helping to push Tox forward, even if that just means telling your friends about us.

What's the next big thing for Tox?

We're currently working on implementing audio and video in all of the main Tox clients. It's a fairly momentous task, so it might take some time, but we feel it's imperative to have proper video calling in order to move forward. Due of the nature of Git and a large community, we're able to work on multiple tasks at once—group chatting, for example—but we're trying to focus most of our efforts on A/V.

Enjoyed this interview? Check out our previous entry in this series featuring Ciaran Gultnieks of F-Droid.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Justin Mason: Links for 2014-07-29

Planet Apache - Tue, 2014-07-29 18:58
  • How to take over the computer of any JVM developer

    To prove how easy [MITM attacking Mavencentral JARs] is to do, I wrote dilettante, a man-in-the-middle proxy that intercepts JARs from maven central and injects malicious code into them. Proxying HTTP traffic through dilettante will backdoor any JARs downloaded from maven central. The backdoored version will retain their functionality, but display a nice message to the user when they use the library.

    (tags: jars dependencies java build clojure security mitm http proxies backdoors scala maven gradle)

  • Spain pushes for ‘Google tax’ to restrict linking

    The government wants to put a tax on linking on the internet. They say that if you want to link to some newspaper’s content, you have to pay a tax. The primary targets of this law are Google News and other aggregators. It would be absurd enough just like that, but the law goes further: they declared it an “inalienable right” so even if I have a blog or a new small digital media publication and I want to let people freely link to my content, I can’t opt-out–they are charging the levy, and giving it to the big press media. It was just the last and only way that the old traditional media companies can get some money from the government, and they strongly lobbied for it. The bill has passed in the Congress where the party in the government has majority (PP, Partido Popular) and it’s headed to the Senate, where they have a majority also.

    (tags: spain stupidity law via:boingboing linking links web news google google-news newspapers old-media taxes)

  • Keyes New Starter Kit for Arduino Fans

    $53 for a reasonable-looking Arduino starter kit, from DealExtreme. cheap cheap! In the inimitable DX style:

    Keyes new beginner starter kit, pay more attention to beginners learning. Users can get rid of the difficult technological learning, from module used to quick start production.

    (tags: learning arduino hardware hacking robotics toys dealextreme tobuy)

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Bryan Pendleton: Desert news

Planet Apache - Tue, 2014-07-29 18:33

Since I happened to be in the desert last week, I've been somewhat sensitive to desert news.

So I found these interesting:

  • Sahara Dust Produces Massive Bahama Carbon SinkThis post was inspired by a terrific new and important paper that speaks to the role of Saharan dust, the iron and other mineral micronutrients it carries to the ocean, and how this results in a new explanation of the power and potency of ocean photosynthesis in regulating global CO2. Once again we find that the living ocean is not merely a chemical test tube but rather a complex living ecology. But sometimes the chemistry shines through as well or I should say the bio-chemistry.

    In short the authors show that when Sahara dust arrives in the Bahamas cyano-bacteria, what we used to call blue-green algae, bloom. As they bloom their photosynthesis removes CO2 from the water making the pH locally rise, alleviating ocean acidification. That blooming rise of ocean pH to a slightly more alkaline state results in what the Bahamanian’s have long called “Ocean Whitings” where the ocean becomes white like milk.

  • Pioneering environmental project taking root in the sandA one hectare site outside Doha, Qatar, will soon host the SFP AS Pilot Plant. It will contain a unique combination of promising environmental technologies carefully integrated in a system to maximize beneficial synergies. A wide specter of leading experts and technology developers are taking part in the effort to realize the project. A cornerstone of the pilot is greenhouses utilizing seawater to provide cool and humid growing conditions for vegetables. The greenhouses will also produce freshwater themselves. The greenhouses will be coupled with a state of the art parabolic trough solar collector with a thermal desalination unit supported by PV-technology. The pilot will also allow for cultivation of algae in a system of photobioreactors and open pond cultivation systems.

    An important part of the pilot is to demonstrate the potential for cultivating desert land and making it green. Outdoor vertical evaporators will create sheltered and humid environments for cultivation of plants. Additionally, the pilot will contain outdoor hydroponic raceways for cultivation of halophytes – plants tolerant of irrigation with salty water. The facilities in the pilot plant will be supported by on-site laboratories, scientists and professional growers.

I have this feeling that the Sahara Forest Project team meant "wide spectrum", not "wide specter", yes? Or maybe they wanted to say "broad coalition"?

Anyway, both pages and their supporting material are fascinating...

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Logging in into Picasa 3.9 under Linux

Planet KDE - Tue, 2014-07-29 16:50

A few years ago I showed my father Picasa under Linux, he liked it and started to use it to upload his photos, and has been using it for almost 6 years, even Google discontinued Picasa for Linux at version 3.0 (Picasa is at 3.9 now).

Unfortunately a few weeks ago seems Google decided to kill support for old APIs in the server side and Picasa 3.0 for Linux was giving back an error when trying to upload an image ("Could not find POST url" or similar). I suggested to wait to see if they would come back, but it seems they haven't and so i've had to fix it for him.

Since he's heavily invested in Picasa I've had to install Picasa for windows under wine to make it work. It has not been trivial to get to work so I'll share it here for others that committed the error of trusting privative software and services.

The story is this: Installing picasa 3.9 for windows under wine is pretty easy (next, next, next). The problem is once you are running it, being able to log in. First problem is that the webview using for login doesn't even show. Most of the interwebs suggest installing ie8 using winetricks to solve that and it indeed solves the problem of the webview not showing, but still i can't log in (interestingly the webview will tell you if you wrote the password wrong).

At this point i was stuck for a few hours, even found some dude that claimed he had installed Google Chrome Frame for Internet Explorer and that had fixed for him. But not for me.

After a few hours, I stopped trusting the internet and started to think. I have a windows installation laying around, and i can log in from there, and once logged in Picasa does not ask for the password again, so it must be storing something no?

So I made a copy of the Program Files folder and compared it after loggin in, folders where exactly the same. So it was not stored there, which makes sense since log in is per user not per machine. Next i tried in that weird Personal Folder (Windows $HOME) but could not find any change either. Last chance was the registry, i used http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/reg_file_from_application.html and saw that when logging in, Picasa writes a few entries in HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Google\Picasa\Picasa2\Preferences namely GoogleOAuth, GoogleOAuthEmail, GoogleOAuthServices and GoogleOAuthVersion, so I copied these over to the wine installation (with "wine regedit") and now my father can run Picasa just fine again.

Lessons learned:
* Non Free Software will eventually come back and hit you, if possible don't use it for stuff that is critical to you
* Think about your problem, sometimes is easier than just googling random instructions from the internet.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

FSF Blogs: FSF congratulates UK Government on choosing Open Document Format

GNU Planet! - Tue, 2014-07-29 15:57

According to a press release from the Cabinet Office, "The standards set out the document file formats that are expected to be used across all government bodies. Government will begin using open formats that will ensure that citizens and people working in government can use the applications that best meet their needs when they are viewing or working on documents together."

The Free Software Foundation applauds the British government's decision to make ODF its official file format. We are especially happy that the decision excludes use of Microsoft's OOXML format, which is not fully free and would prevent the goal of interoperability. Now British citizens can use free software like LibreOffice without worrying that they'll have trouble applying for a passport, reading court documents, or getting their pensions.

The British government's adoption of ODF will make it harder for laggards to ignore the standard file format, and could inspire other governments to make the switch. After all, it's unethical to spend public funds on proprietary software that hinders interoperability and forces citizens to use the same software or miss out on access to vital government documents.

What's so great about ODF?

Users can read and write OpenDocument files without agreeing to proprietary software licenses and programmers are free to write applications that support ODF without fear of patent claims or licensing issues. Governments, businesses, and archivists can use ODF to ensure critical documents can be read for years to come, without being forced to pay for updates to proprietary software.

Using free formats is one of the easiest and most important things we can do to defend software freedom. We also need to reject proprietary formats from Microsoft Office and Apple's iWork (.doc[x], .ppt[x], etc.). At the FSF, we use only free formats in our office and we're proud to work with the LibreOffice project as a member of the Document Foundation's Advisory Board.

So, all of you in the UK who've kept a copy of Microsoft Office around for official business, now you can ditch the proprietary office suite and upgrade to one that respects your freedom: LibreOffice.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

FSF congratulates UK Government on choosing Open Document Format

FSF Blogs - Tue, 2014-07-29 15:57

According to a press release from the Cabinet Office, "The standards set out the document file formats that are expected to be used across all government bodies. Government will begin using open formats that will ensure that citizens and people working in government can use the applications that best meet their needs when they are viewing or working on documents together."

The Free Software Foundation applauds the British government's decision to make ODF its official file format. We are especially happy that the decision excludes use of Microsoft's OOXML format, which is not fully free and would prevent the goal of interoperability. Now British citizens can use free software like LibreOffice without worrying that they'll have trouble applying for a passport, reading court documents, or getting their pensions.

The British government's adoption of ODF will make it harder for laggards to ignore the standard file format, and could inspire other governments to make the switch. After all, it's unethical to spend public funds on proprietary software that hinders interoperability and forces citizens to use the same software or miss out on access to vital government documents.

What's so great about ODF?

Users can read and write OpenDocument files without agreeing to proprietary software licenses and programmers are free to write applications that support ODF without fear of patent claims or licensing issues. Governments, businesses, and archivists can use ODF to ensure critical documents can be read for years to come, without being forced to pay for updates to proprietary software.

Using free formats is one of the easiest and most important things we can do to defend software freedom. We also need to reject proprietary formats from Microsoft Office and Apple's iWork (.doc[x], .ppt[x], etc.). At the FSF, we use only free formats in our office and we're proud to work with the LibreOffice project as a member of the Document Foundation's Advisory Board.

So, all of you in the UK who've kept a copy of Microsoft Office around for official business, now you can ditch the proprietary office suite and upgrade to one that respects your freedom: LibreOffice.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Ian Campbell: Debian Installer ARM64 Dailies

Planet Debian - Tue, 2014-07-29 14:36

It's taken a while but all of the pieces are finally in place to run successfully through Debian Installer on ARM64 using the Debian ARM64 port.

So I'm now running nightly builds locally and uploading them to http://www.hellion.org.uk/debian/didaily/arm64/.

If you have CACert in your CA roots then you might prefer the slightly more secure version.

Hopefully before too long I can arrange to have them building on one of the project machines and uploaded to somewhere a little more formal like people.d.o or even the regular Debian Installer dailies site. This will have to do for now though.

Warning

The arm64 port is currently hosted on Debian Ports which only supports the unstable "sid" distribution. This means that installation can be a bit of a moving target and sometimes fails to download various installer components or installation packages. Mostly it's just a case of waiting for the buildd and/or archive to catch up. You have been warned!

Installing in a Xen guest

If you are lucky enough to have access to some 64-bit ARM hardware (such as the APM X-Gene, see wiki.xen.org for setup instructions) then installing Debian as a guest is pretty straightforward.

I suppose if you had lots of time (and I do mean lots) you could also install under Xen running on the Foundation or Fast Model. I wouldn't recommend it though.

First download the installer kernel and ramdisk onto your dom0 filesystem (e.g. to /root/didaily/arm64).

Second create a suitable guest config file such as:

name = "debian-installer" disk = ["phy:/dev/LVM/debian,xvda,rw"] vif = [ '' ] memory = 512 kernel = "/root/didaily/arm64/vmlinuz" ramdisk= "/root/didaily/arm64/initrd.gz" extra = "console=hvc0 -- "

In this example I'm installing to a raw logical volume /dev/LVM/debian. You might also want to use randmac to generate a permanent MAC address for the Ethernet device (specified as vif = ['mac=xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx']).

Once that is done you can start the guest with:

xl create -c cfg

From here you'll be in the installer and things carry on as usual. You'll need to manually point it to ftp.debian-ports.org as the mirror, or you can preseed by appending to the extra line in the cfg like so:

mirror/country=manual mirror/http/hostname=ftp.debian-ports.org mirror/http/directory=/debian

Apart from that there will be a warning about not knowing how to setup the bootloader but that is normal for now.

Installing in Qemu

To do this you will need a version of http://www.qemu.org which supports qemu-system-aarch64. The latest release doesn't yet so I've been using v2.1.0-rc3 (it seems upstream are now up to -rc5). Once qemu is built and installed and the installer kernel and ramdisk have been downloaded to $DI you can start with:

qemu-system-aarch64 -M virt -cpu cortex-a57 \ -kernel $DI/vmlinuz -initrd $DI/initrd.gz \ -append "console=ttyAMA0 -- " \ -serial stdio -nographic --monitor none \ -drive file=rootfs.qcow2,if=none,id=blk,format=qcow2 -device virtio-blk-device,drive=blk \ -net user,vlan=0 -device virtio-net-device,vlan=0

That's using a qcow2 image for the rootfs, I think I created it with something like:

qemu-img create -f qcow2 rootfs.qcow2 4G

Once started installation proceeds much like normal. As with Xen you will need to either point it at the debian-ports archive by hand or preseed by adding to the -append line and the warning about no bootloader configuration is expected.

Installing on real hardware

Someone should probably try this ;-).

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Drupal Easy: Drupal Web Developer Career Series Post 4: View from the Summit

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2014-07-29 13:46

This is final installment of our four-part blog post series that encapsulates the advice, tips and must-do elements of career building in the Drupal Community from the panel of experts collected for DrupalEasy’s DrupalCon Austin session; Drupal Career Trailhead; Embark on a Path to Success. It will be listed with other career resources for reference at the DrupalEasy Academy Career Center.

-->

read more

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Drupal Easy: DrupalEasy Podcast 136: Wolves (Jason Smith - Weather.com)

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2014-07-29 13:29
Download Podcast 136

Jason Smith (Silcon.Valet), Solutions Architect for Mediacurrent, joins Mike, and Ryan to talk about one of the highest-trafficked sites in the world re-launching on Drupal: weather.com. Other topics discussed include the Acquia CEO’s recent Reddit AMA, sprint nutrition, and Damien McKenna.

read more

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Daniel Pocock: Pruning Syslog entries from MongoDB

Planet Debian - Tue, 2014-07-29 13:27

I previously announced the availability of rsyslog+MongoDB+LogAnalyzer in Debian wheezy-backports. This latest rsyslog with MongoDB storage support is also available for Ubuntu and Fedora users in one way or another.

Just one thing was missing: a flexible way to prune the database. LogAnalyzer provides a very basic pruning script that simply purges all records over a certain age. The script hasn't been adapted to work within the package layout. It is written in PHP, which may not be ideal for people who don't actually want LogAnalyzer on their Syslog/MongoDB host.

Now there is a convenient solution: I've just contributed a very trivial Python script for selectively pruning the records.

Thanks to Python syntax and the PyMongo client, it is extremely concise: in fact, here is the full script:

#!/usr/bin/python import syslog import datetime from pymongo import Connection # It assumes we use the default database name 'logs' and collection 'syslog' # in the rsyslog configuration. with Connection() as client: db = client.logs table = db.syslog #print "Initial count: %d" % table.count() today = datetime.datetime.today() # remove ANY record older than 5 weeks except mail.info t = today - datetime.timedelta(weeks=5) table.remove({"time":{ "$lt": t }, "syslog_fac": { "$ne" : syslog.LOG_MAIL }}) # remove any debug record older than 7 days t = today - datetime.timedelta(days=7) table.remove({"time":{ "$lt": t }, "syslog_sever": syslog.LOG_DEBUG}) #print "Final count: %d" % table.count()

Just put it in /usr/local/bin and run it daily from cron.

Customization

Just adapt the table.remove statements as required. See the PyMongo tutorial for a very basic introduction to the query syntax and full details in the MongoDB query operator reference for creating more elaborate pruning rules.

Potential improvements
  • Indexing the columns used in the queries
  • Logging progress and stats to Syslog


LogAnalyzer using a database backend such as MongoDB is very easy to set up and much faster than working with text-based log files

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Midwestern Mac, LLC: Moving on to Acquia

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2014-07-29 13:22

I wanted to post this here, since this is more of my sounding board for the Drupal community, but the details are on my personal blog: starting October 6, I will be working for Acquia as a Technical Architect in their Professional Services group!

What does this mean for this site/blog, Hosted Apache Solr, and Server Check.in? Not much, actually—they will continue on, likely at the same pace of development they've been for the past year or so (I'll work on them when I get an odd hour or two...). I am still working on completing Ansible for DevOps, and will actually be accelerating my writing schedule prior to starting the new job, since I'll have a little wedge of free time (a.k.a. unemployment!) between Mercy (my current full-time employer) and Acquia.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Gunnar Wolf: Editorial process starting in 3... 2... 1...

Planet Debian - Tue, 2014-07-29 13:09

Yay!

Today I finally submitted our book, Fundamentos de Sistemas Operativos, for the Editorial Department of our institute. Of course, I'm not naïve enough to assume there won't be a heavy editorial phase, but I'm more than eager to dive into it... And have the book printed in maybe two months time!

Of course, this book is to be published under a free license (CC-BY-SA). And I'm talking with the coauthors, we are about to push the Git repository to a public location, as we believe the source for the text and figures can also be of interest to others.

The book itself (as I've already boasted about here :-} ) is available (somewhat as a preprint) for download.

[update] Talked it over with the coauthors, and we finally have a public repository! Clone it from:

https://github.com/gwolf/sistop.git

Or just browse it from Github's web interface.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

ownCloud 7 Release Party August 8, Berlin

Planet KDE - Tue, 2014-07-29 13:09
In a little over a week, on the 8th of August, you're all invited to join Danimo, Blizz and myself at a release party to celebrate the awesomeness that is ownCloud 7 in Berlin!



When and whereWe will gather at 7pm at the Wikimedia office in Berlin:
Tempelhofer Ufer 23/24
10963 Berlin
Germany
It is awesome that we can use their office, a big thank you to our fellow data lovers!!

So we start to gather at 7 and round 7:30 we'll have a demo of/talk about ownCloud 7. We will order some pizza to eat. After that: party time!






Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Carlos Sanchez: Anatomy of a DevOps Orchestration Engine: (III) Agents

Planet Apache - Tue, 2014-07-29 12:25

Previously: (II) Architecture

In Maestro we typically use a Maestro master server and multiple Maestro agents. Each Maestro Agent is just a small service where the actual work happens, it processes the work sent by the master, via ActiveMQ, and executes the plugins with the data received.

The two main goals of the agent are load distribution and heterogeneous composition support. The more agents running, the more compositions that can be executed in parallel, and compositions can target specific agents based on its features, such as architecture, operating system,… which is a must for development environments. For simplicity each agent can only run one composition at a time, but you could have multiple agent processes running in a single server.

It uses Puppet Facter to gather the machine facts (operating system, memory size, cloud provider data,…) and sends all that information to the master, that can use it to filter what compositions run in the agent. For instance I may want to run a composition in a Windows agent, or in an agent that has some specific piece of software installed. Facter supports external facts so it is really easy to add new filtering capabilities, and not be just limited to what Facter provides out of the box. A small text file can be added to /etc/facter/facts.d/ and Facter would report it to the master server.

Agents are installed alongside with all the tools that may be needed, from Git, to clone repos, to Jenkins swarm to reuse the agents as Jenkins slaves, or mcollective agents to allow updating the agent itself automatically with Puppet when new manifests are deployed to the Puppet master. In our internal environment any commit to Puppet manifests or modules automatically trigger our rspec-puppet tests, the deployment of those manifests to the Puppet master, and a cascading Puppet update of all the machines in our staging environment using MCollective. All our Puppet modules are likewise built and tested on each commit and a new version published to the Puppet Forge automatically using rspec-puppet and Puppet Blacksmith.

Maestro also supports manually assigning agents to pools, and matching compositions with agent pools, so compositions can be limited to run in a predefined set of agents.

The agent process is written in Ruby and runs under JRuby in the JVM, thus supporting multiple operating systems and architectures, and the ability to write extensions in Java or Ruby easily. It connects to the master’s Composition Execution Engine through ActiveMQ using STOMP for messaging.

Plugins

Plugins are small pieces of code written in Java or Ruby that run in the agent to execute the actual work. We have made all plugins available in GitHub so they can be used as examples to create new plugins for custom tasks.

Plugins can be added to Maestro at runtime and automatically show up in the composition editor. The plugin manifest defines the plugin images, what tasks are defined, and what fields in each task. Based on the workload received, the agent downloads and executes the plugin, which just accesses the fields in the workload and do the actual work, whatever it might be, sending output back to LuCEE and populating the composition context.

For instance the Fog plugin can manage multiple clouds, such as EC2, where it can start and stop instances. The plugin receives the fields defined in the composition (credentials, image id,…), calls the EC2 API, streams the status to the Maestro output (successfully created, instance id,…) and puts some data (ids of the instances created, public ips,…) in the composition context for other tasks to use. All of that in less than 100 lines of code.

The context is important to avoid redefining field values and provide some meaningful defaults, so if you have a provision task and a deprovision task, the values in the the latter are inherited from the former.

Agent cloud manager

The agent cloud manager is a service that runs on Google Compute Engine and watches a number of Maestro installations to provide automatic agent scaling. Based on preconfigured parameters such as min/max number of agents for each agent pool, max waiting time,… and the current status of each agent pool queue, the service can start new machines from specific images, suspend them (destroy the instance but keep the disk), or completely destroy them.

We are also giving a try to Docker instead of using full vms and have created a couple interesting Docker images on CentOS for developers, a Jenkins swarm slave image and a build agent image that includes everything we use at development: Java, Ant, Maven, RVM (with 1.9, 2.0, 2.1, JRuby), Git, Svn, all configurable with credentials at runtime.


Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Christian Perrier: Developers per country (July 2014)

Planet Debian - Tue, 2014-07-29 11:34
This is time again for my annual report about the number of developers per country.

This is now the sixth edition of this report. Former editions:

So, here we are with the July 2014 version, sorted by the ratio of *active* developers per million population for each country.

Act: number of active developers Dev: total number of developers A/M: number of active devels per million pop. D/M: number of devels per million pop. 2009: rank in 2009 2010: rank in 2010 2011: rank in 2011 (June) 2012: rank in 2012 (June) 2013: rank in 2012 (July) 2014: rank now Code Name Population Act Dev Dev Act/Million Dev/Million 2009 2010 June 2011 June 2012 July 2013 July 2014
fi Finland 5259250 19 31 3,61 5,89 1 1 1 1 1 1
ie Ireland 4670976 13 17 2,78 3,64 13 9 6 2 2 2
nz New Zealand 4331600 11 15 2,54 3,46 4 3 5 7 7 3 * mq Martinique 396404 1 1 2,52 2,52

3 4 4 4
se Sweden 9088728 22 37 2,42 4,07 3 6 7 5 5 5
ch Switzerland 7870134 19 29 2,41 3,68 2 2 2 3 3 6 * no Norway 4973029 11 14 2,21 2,82 5 4 4 6 6 7 * at Austria 8217280 18 29 2,19 3,53 6 8 10 10 10 8 * de Germany 81471834 164 235 2,01 2,88 7 7 9 9 8 9 * lu Luxemburg 503302 1 1 1,99 1,99 8 5 8 8 9 10 * fr France 65350000 101 131 1,55 2 12 12 11 11 11 11
au Australia 22607571 32 60 1,42 2,65 9 10 12 12 12 12
be Belgium 11071483 14 17 1,26 1,54 10 11 13 13 13 13
uk United-Kingdom 62698362 77 118 1,23 1,88 14 14 14 14 14 14
nl Netherlands 16728091 18 40 1,08 2,39 11 13 15 15 15 15
ca Canada 33476688 34 63 1,02 1,88 15 15 17 16 16 16
dk Denmark 5529888 5 10 0,9 1,81 17 17 16 17 17 17
es Spain 46754784 34 56 0,73 1,2 16 16 19 18 18 18
it Italy 59464644 36 52 0,61 0,87 23 22 22 19 19 19
hu Hungary 10076062 6 12 0,6 1,19 18 25 26 20 24 20 * cz Czech Rep 10190213 6 6 0,59 0,59 21 20 21 21 20 21 * us USA 313232044 175 382 0,56 1,22 19 21 25 24 22 22
il Israel 7740900 4 6 0,52 0,78 24 24 24 25 23 23
hr Croatia 4290612 2 2 0,47 0,47 20 18 18 26 25 24 * lv Latvia 2204708 1 1 0,45 0,45 26 26 27 27 26 25 * bg Bulgaria 7364570 3 3 0,41 0,41 25 23 23 23 27 26 * sg Singapore 5183700 2 2 0,39 0,39


33 33 27 * uy Uruguay 3477778 1 2 0,29 0,58 22 27 28 28 28 28
pl Poland 38441588 11 15 0,29 0,39 29 29 30 30 30 29 * jp Japan 127078679 36 52 0,28 0,41 30 28 29 29 29 30 * lt Lithuania 3535547 1 1 0,28 0,28 28 19 20 22 21 31 * gr Greece 10787690 3 4 0,28 0,37 33 38 34 35 35 32 * cr Costa Rica 4301712 1 1 0,23 0,23 31 30 31 31 31 33 * by Belarus 9577552 2 2 0,21 0,21 35 36 39 39 32 34 * ar Argentina 40677348 8 10 0,2 0,25 34 33 35 32 37 35 * pt Portugal 10561614 2 4 0,19 0,38 27 32 32 34 34 36 * sk Slovakia 5477038 1 1 0,18 0,18 32 31 33 36 36 37 * rs Serbia 7186862 1 1 0,14 0,14



38 38
tw Taiwan 23040040 3 3 0,13 0,13 37 34 37 37 39 39
br Brazil 192376496 18 21 0,09 0,11 36 35 38 38 40 40
cu Cuba 11241161 1 1 0,09 0,09
38 41 41 41 41
co Colombia 45566856 4 5 0,09 0,11 41 44 46 47 46 42 * kr South Korea 48754657 4 6 0,08 0,12 39 39 42 42 42 43 * gt Guatemala 13824463 1 1 0,07 0,07



43 44 * ec Ecuador 15007343 1 1 0,07 0,07
40 43 43 45 45
cl Chile 16746491 1 2 0,06 0,12 42 41 44 44 47 46 * za South Africa 50590000 3 10 0,06 0,2 38 48 48 48 48 47 * ru Russia 143030106 8 9 0,06 0,06 43 42 47 45 49 48 * mg Madagascar 21281844 1 1 0,05 0,05 44 37 40 40 50 49 * ro Romania 21904551 1 2 0,05 0,09 45 43 45 46 51 50 * ve Venezuela 28047938 1 1 0,04 0,04 40 45 50 49 44 51 * my Malaysia 28250000 1 1 0,04 0,04

49 50 52 52
pe Peru 29907003 1 1 0,03 0,03 46 46 51 51 53 53
tr Turkey 74724269 2 2 0,03 0,03 47 47 52 52 54 54
ua Ukraine 45134707 1 1 0,02 0,02 48 53 58 59 55 55
th Thailand 66720153 1 2 0,01 0,03 50 50 54 54 56 56
eg Egypt 80081093 1 3 0,01 0,04 51 51 55 55 57 57
mx Mexico 112336538 1 1 0,01 0,01 49 49 53 53 58 58
cn China 1344413526 10 14 0,01 0,01 53 53 57 56 59 59
in India 1210193422 8 9 0,01 0,01 52 52 56 57 60 60
sv El Salvador 7066403 0 1 0 0,14

36 58 61 61































969 1561 62,08%







A few interesting facts:
  • New Zealand bumps from rank 7 to rank 3, thanks to one new active developer
  • Switzerland loses one developer and goes donw to rank 6
  • Norway also slightly goes down by losing one developer
  • With two more developers, Austria climbs up to rank 8 and overtakes Germany...;-)
  • Hungary climbs a little bit by gaining one developer
  • Singapore doubles its number of developers from 1 to 2 and bumps from 33 to 27
  • One rank up too for Poland that gained one developer
  • Down to rank 31 for Lithuania by losing one developer
  • Up to rank 32 for Greece with 4 developers instead of 3
  • Argentina goes up by havign two more developers (it lost 2 last year)
  • Up from 46 to 42 for Colombia by winning one more developer
  • One more developer and Russia climps from 49 to 48
  • One less for Venezuela that has only one developer left...:-(
  • No new country this year. Less movement towards "the universal OS"?
  • We have 12 more active Debian developers and 26 more developers overall. Less progression than last year
  • The ratio of active developers increases is nearly stable though slightly decreasing
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Rohan on ubuntuonair.com

Planet KDE - Tue, 2014-07-29 11:07

Kubuntu Ninja Rohan was on today’s ubuntuonair talking about Plasma 5 and what is happening in Kubuntu.  Watch it now to hear the news.

 

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Blink Reaction: An Introduction to Google Tag Manager

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2014-07-29 11:02

When Google Tag Manager and Drupal work together, great things can happen. Both from a web developer's perspective and from a marketer's perspective. We'll take a look at how it all comes together.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets
Syndicate content