Planet Apache

Syndicate content
Updated: 16 min 42 sec ago

Davanum Srinivas: Deploying BOSH with Micro BOSH on latest DevStack

Tue, 2014-06-24 13:33
Follow up to Running Cloud Foundry’s Micro BOSH On Latest DevStack, I had to bump the VOLUME_BACKING_FILE_SIZE to 200GB in devstack as 100GB was not enough. Instructions from http://docs.cloudfoundry.org/deploying/openstack/deploying_bosh.html were handy as usual. Here’s my bosh-openstack.yml
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Davanum Srinivas: Running Cloud Foundry’s Micro BOSH on latest DevStack

Tue, 2014-06-24 07:45
The Cloud Foundry docs are excellent. Here’s where i started from: http://docs.cloudfoundry.org/deploying/openstack/ I provisioned a big beefy bare metal box with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS on SoftLayer and installed DevStack on it as usual. Here’s the super simple local.conf that i used. Note the 100GB volume needed later for Micro BOSH deployment. Once you deploy DevStack, […]
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Justin Mason: Links for 2014-06-23

Mon, 2014-06-23 18:58
  • Startup equity gotcha

    ‘Two months ago, an early Uber employee thought that he had found a buyer for his vested stock, at $200 per share. But when his agent tried to seal the deal, Uber refused to sign off on the transfer. Instead, it offered to buy back the shares for around $135 a piece, which is within the same price range that Google Ventures and TPG Capital had paid to invest in Uber the previous July. Take it or hold it.’ As rbranson on Twitter put it: ‘reminder that startup equity is basically worthless unless you’re a founder or investor, OR the company goes public.’

    (tags: startups uber stock stock-options shares share-option equity via:rbranson work)

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Bruce Snyder: Remembering My Cycling Accident :: Bruce Snyder's Status

Sun, 2014-06-22 22:40
The first write-up about my near-fatal cycling accident was posted about two-and-a-half weeks ago. In that time I have done a lot of resting, healing and reflection upon the accident. My condition has improved by leaps and bounds in that time and I am just simply elated to be alive.

During that first post, I wasn't truly feeling 100% myself because it was only two weeks after the accident. I was still dealing with a lot of pain and I was beyond exhausted due to the shock my body incurred. I also experienced a tremendous emotional strain from the accident. In the beginning, I had nightmares about it. Even though I was completely snowed by heavy narcotics, the accident played through my head over and over again. I had trouble distinguishing dream state from reality. I was really fucked up, both physically and emotionally. But in the last two or three weeks, I have spent a lot of time meditating and thinking very deeply about the whole experience. I can confidently say that I am truly feeling much better now. I finally feel like myself again. My wife Janene has even told me I have that old spark back in my eyes. But this doesn't mean that I'm completely past everything. I still have moments where it's difficult to think back through it all; where I break down in tears out of the blue. I feel like I lost a part of myself that day. This accident has changed me.

Because I find it therapeutic to write about difficult situations I have experienced in my life, I think it will do me some good to recount everything I remember from this accident in writing. Here is what I remember about the accident.
On that Thursday afternoon, my buddy Tim and I went riding out north of Boulder to Nelson Road, to 75th, around the Boulder reservoir on a dirt road and back to downtown Boulder. It's about a 30 mile ride. Usually I would have felt completely spent by this point in the ride, but that day I was riding my brand new bike that I purchased less than two weeks prior. This new bike changed my riding because I did not have nearly as much body fatigue as I did with my old bike. So when we got back to downtown Boulder, Tim went back to work and I decided to ride up Flagstaff Mountain before going back to work.  After riding up part of Flagstaff, I came back to downtown Boulder via 9th Street. There was another cyclist and a slow car in front of me so I couldn't go very fast. I was riding at a rather slow pace and cars were passing me. Out of the blue, I am slamming on my brakes for a car that came gunning through the intersection of 9th and Marine like rocket. Because I slammed on my front brakes, I went flying over the handlebars, landed directly in front of the car that came gunning through the intersection. Everything happened so fast that I couldn't process what was happening... until I could. Only seconds later, I realized that I was being run over by the car. In the midst of the chaos, I was thinking to myself, 'I am being run over by a car and I'm going to die. Where are Janene and my girls?' The next thing I remember as I am gasping for air and screaming from the pain, someone is speaking to me (who I now know was Gareth) asking me my name and telling me to calm down my breathing. I focused on his voice until the EMTs arrived. Unfortunately, through it all, I remained conscious. All the way to the hospital and into the emergency room where a small army of people descended upon me to assess the damage. I was in excruciating pain. I begged them to knock me out. But they said they could not do this because they needed to know from me what parts of my body hurt and what parts did not. Then a surgeon is asking me if he has my permission to inject some dye to check my organs and then take me to surgery. At least I had the sense to tell them that they were not doing to do anything to me until Janene was there. Unlike me, she would have a clear head and be capable of making decisions. I had to tell them Janene's phone number at least two or three times. They said they spoke to her and that she is on the way. Then they start giving me doses of Dilaudid, a heavy narcotic pain medication. After the pain meds began to be injected, I can't recall much. I have flashes of memory like a haunting dream. I vaguely recollect Janene arriving but after that everything went black. The next thing I remember is a series of near waking moments in the ICU. The pain was unbelievable and I kept half-waking up only to be thrust back into a shroud of pain that engulfed every part of me. Then I was given more pain meds and I drifted out again, everything faded to black. Over and over this happened for the first week. Janene told me only a couple days ago that back then I didn't even realize the seriousness of the situation until I recognized that both my parents and Janene's parents and my brother were in my hospital room. All of them live in Illinois and would have driven 15 hours to get to Boulder. She said that the look on my face told her that I realized how grave the situation was at that time. The next week or so was a confusion of dreams and a barely lucid state for me. It was only after this first week that I partially awoke out of the snowy narcotic-induced state that I had been in. I had many visitors the first week and even into the second week. Although I recognized them at the moment, I have little memory of who actually visited and what we discussed.

As painful as this has been for me to write down (this post took me two days to write), it has already helped me to deal with the whole situation. This is definitely the most difficult experience of my life.

The good news is that I am healing well and continuing to rest. My projected release date from the hospital is June 17th, a whole two weeks before the original deadline. My doctor says he has no choice because of the rapid progress I have been making.

Tonight Janene and I ate dinner at a small Thai restaurant near Craig Hospital. It made me feel good again, like I'm returning to the real world.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Bruce Snyder: Regaining My Indpendence :: Bruce Snyder's Status

Sun, 2014-06-22 22:40


Last week I got to escape from the hospital for a few hours to attend my youngest daughter Bailey's continuation ceremony from fifth grade to sixth grade. I really had a wonderful time. I got to see Bailey with all her friends who have grown so close over the years and teachers who we have known since Jade attended Louisville Elementary some years ago.

I also was able to see some of our friends from the Louisville community who have offered my family so much support since the accident. I'm so glad that I chose this as my first major goal in getting back home because it was like an end of an era for many families in Louisville. We are not the only family in our circle of friends who watched their youngest finish up at Louisville Elementary. There's a whole group of kids who are the youngest sibling in their house just like Bailey and they are all friends. This whole experience made me really want to be back in Louisville with my family and friends again.

As I get closer to my discharge date from the hospital (June 17), I can't help but think how far I've come since the accident almost six weeks ago. I've had my good days and not so good days, but through it all the constant has been such amazing support from so many family and friends. I cannot say thank you enough to all the family and friends who have offered support. Just hearing that someone is thinking about me really helps. It's these simply things that really lift my spirits when I'm not having such a good day or when I'm feeling tired from the physical therapy. I was truly amazed that two friends from Los Angeles, Amelia and David, flew in on Thursday and Friday just to visit me. It was so great to see them and to have their positive spirits around me. This just raises the question again: how do you repay such tremendous support? I am just stunned by the compassion people have shown me through this experience.

Speaking of my discharge date, the closer I get to it, the higher my medical team raises the bar for me. This week I began doing the various physical therapy classes from 8am - 4pm every day. This is just exhausting. The good news is this hard work has allowed me to begin to sleep at night without a sleeping aid. I used to challenge myself with personal records from all of the cycling and running I did, now I'm challenged with everyday tasks like putting on shoes or getting out of bed in the morning. Before the accident, I always took for granted all the simple things in my daily life. Who ever thought that those easy tasks would ever be such a challenge?!

I'm also learning that I need to plan ahead for everything I do. Even for such simple tasks as getting out of bed in the morning. Before I get out of my wheelchair and take off the back brace in the evening, I need to pick out the clothes to wear the next day. This is so that I can reach them while I'm lying in bed before I put on the back brace. At least I do have more independence now. I can get up in the morning by myself, I can shower by myself, I even drove a car for the first time today. I'm beginning to feel like I am regaining my independence. The next big tasks are adjusting to life at home and getting back to work. But I still have a couple of weeks to prepare for these changes.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Bruce Snyder: Why I am Thankful :: Bruce Snyder's Status

Sun, 2014-06-22 22:40
In previous posts since the accident, I have thanked many people who have helped to get me through this very difficult time in my life. This accident has changed my life and changed my of view the world.

When I arrived at Craig Hospital, my doctor was reviewing my case with me and he mentioned the collapsed lung, the chest tube and then he told me that my other lung had deflated as well but somehow it re-inflated. Then he referred to me telling him I was gasping for air between my screams of pain as I lay in the street after the accident. He told me that my gasping probably is what re-inflated the lung and saved my life. This statement really shook me to my core. It was the first time I think that I realized I really could have been killed. That night the nightmares stopped and the next day I awoke with this feeling I had never felt -- I was absolutely elated to be alive. At that moment, my life changed again. No longer was I trying to figure out this whole experience, all I could think about was the fact that I was alive and I could still be with my family and friends. My next thought was that the accident could have been so much worse. And since that day, this has been my mantra for everyone -- it could have been so much worse. For this reason, I suddenly became extremely thankful for all the things in my life.

Below is a list of items for which I am thankful that help to describe how I'm feeling since the accident:
  • I am thankful to be alive. I may not ever walk the same as I did before and that's alright. If I'm meant to be in a wheel chair or walk with braces, so be it. I accept that this terrible accident took place and I have chosen to move on with my life. 
  • I am thankful for the friends and family who have kept me in their thoughts. I have had so many people reach out via email, text, phone, tweets, hospital visits, etc. to let me know that they are thinking of me. I was especially moved by these messages because they have helped me more than you will ever know. 
  • I am thankful that my injuries are not worse. I am in the Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) unit on the third floor of Craig Hospital. Down on the second floor is the Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) unit. I see many people on the second floor whose mental existence will never be the same again. I have meditated on this many times and I have so many things to look forward to because I was spared a head injury. Even if my feet remain paralyzed, I am thankful that I still have my head, my hands and my heart intact. 
  • I am thankful that I can still do the work for my profession. Because I have my head and hands, there is nothing stopping me from eventually returning to my work. I have many people in the office who will assist me with difficult tasks, but for the most part I can continue after I have healed. 
  • I am thankful for compassionate people in this world. I am so grateful that Gareth acted so quickly to help a stranger in distress. None of the other folks standing around me got down on the pavement to provide me a calming voice. This is probably the biggest overarching lesson that I have learned from this experience. Without compassion and love for your fellow human beings, people would not exist. 
I encourage anyone who reads this to take the time to show some compassion to the people in your life. My family and friends, the folks here at Craig Hospital, even some people who I have never met all demonstrated to me that compassion can help to heal many wounds, both physical and emotional.
    Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

    Bryan Pendleton: A beautiful game vs Portugal

    Sun, 2014-06-22 19:46

    Surely today's match was not the best effort of either team. There were missed passes, mistakes, and plenty of ups and downs.

    But what a thriller! What entertainment!

    What a shame the game wasn't 15 seconds shorter :)

    The U.S. must count themselves extremely fortunate to have 4 points from these first two matches.

    The hardest match of the three awaits, however, as Germany have 4 points as well. Since all 4 teams in the group are still alive, the final matches will be exciting and energetic.

    And now we will see if Klinsmann's knowledge of his home country does indeed provide the U.S. with that extra bit of advantage to give us a hope, a chance.

    I know where I'll be, bright and early on Thursday morning. :)

    Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

    Nick Kew: The new workspace

    Sun, 2014-06-22 18:11

    Since buying the treadmill desk I’ve been enjoying some benefits.  I’m just as fat as ever, and the back is neither better nor worse, but I’m getting a lot less neck and shoulder pain.

    I’ve also bought a 27″ monitor and desk-mounting arm to go with it.  I think 27″ was a mistake: 24″ with the same (1080p) resolution would’ve served me better.  Either way, I now have the luxury of sufficient width for three working windows at full height and without overlap, which is very nice.  And the sound surprised me by being rather better than the old monitor, though of course neither was bought with sound quality in mind.

    The monitor works fine with both laptops.  As a matter of convenience I’m using it with the macbook.  Here I can use a wired internet connection where it’s needed, and wireless from the ultrabook when I’m elsewhere in the house (or away).  This is a real shame, because it loses me the benefit of the macbook’s own screen, whose display quality is far and away the best of any I have.

    As for the treadmill, I felt tired very quickly for the first day or two but rapidly grew accustomed to it.  On a working day now its computer clocks up double-digit distance (measured in Km) at speeds usually between 3 and 4 km/h (all speeds feel faster on the treadmill than in normal life, probably because the stride is much more constrained and one needs to keep the body much more static to use the ‘puter).  The fastest I’ve sustained was 5km/h, though that worked up too much of a sweat for anything more demanding than browsing the ‘net.  Of course, I still always alternate working at the treadmill with other places, though alas the ultrabook’s screen is far from adequate to take advantage of the summer weather and work outdoors.


    Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

    Nick Kew: The new workspace

    Sun, 2014-06-22 18:11

    Since buying the treadmill desk I’ve been enjoying some benefits.  I’m just as fat as ever, and the back is neither better nor worse, but I’m getting a lot less neck and shoulder pain.

    I’ve also bought a 27″ monitor and desk-mounting arm to go with it.  I think 27″ was a mistake: 24″ with the same (1080p) resolution would’ve served me better.  Either way, I now have the luxury of sufficient width for three working windows at full height and without overlap, which is very nice.  And the sound surprised me by being rather better than the old monitor, though of course neither was bought with sound quality in mind.

    The monitor works fine with both laptops.  As a matter of convenience I’m using it with the macbook.  Here I can use a wired internet connection where it’s needed, and wireless from the ultrabook when I’m elsewhere in the house (or away).  This is a real shame, because it loses me the benefit of the macbook’s own screen, whose display quality is far and away the best of any I have.

    As for the treadmill, I felt tired very quickly for the first day or two but rapidly grew accustomed to it.  On a working day now its computer clocks up double-digit distance (measured in Km) at speeds usually between 3 and 4 km/h (all speeds feel faster on the treadmill than in normal life, probably because the stride is much more constrained and one needs to keep the body much more static to use the ‘puter).  The fastest I’ve sustained was 5km/h, though that worked up too much of a sweat for anything more demanding than browsing the ‘net.  Of course, I still always alternate working at the treadmill with other places, though alas the ultrabook’s screen is far from adequate to take advantage of the summer weather and work outdoors.


    Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

    Bryan Pendleton: One game at a time!

    Sat, 2014-06-21 21:52

    All the stupid U.S. media are already talking about the Germany match.

    First we have to play Portugal!

    One thing at a time.

    I hope they play Wondo, just because he's a bit of a local talent.

    And he was a Chico alum, though a few years before my son got there.

    One way or another, I'm definitely looking forward to tomorrow's match; may they all play well.

    Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

    Nick Kew: A sacrifice on the altar

    Sat, 2014-06-21 17:37

    The Thugs’ Best Friend

    I had to spend a lot of time in Brighton over the autumn, winter and spring.  Just a few minutes walk from George Street in Hove, a satellite-town-centre shopping street.  George Street has long been pedestrianised during shopping hours, making it a pleasant place to go for one’s shopping, or for a refreshment at one of its many pubs or cafés.  The only fly in the ointment was that on Sundays it was open to cars, turning it from a pleasant place to a stressful no-go area.

    This winter was different.  I went there several times during regular weekday shopping hours, only to find it infested by cars.  After a little while I learned to treat it as a no-go area at all times.  A sad loss: there’s no comparable shopping street for some distance.  I don’t know why such a street has been sacrificed.  The local council is run by the Green Party: perhaps they’re as false to their roots as all the rest, but even so this seems extraordinary.

    Today’s news: our towns are yet again to be sacrificed on the alter of the Great God motorcar.  This time it’s parking, and no matter how much commonsense and/or the law want to save an area for people, councils are to be deprived of the practical means to enforce anything.  Of course the propagandists wheeled out several motorists with legitimate-sounding horror stories of having been fined unreasonably, yet none of those were caught by the enforcement systems they’re banning!

    The thugs’ best friend has struck another blow against humanity, and no doubt driven another nail into the coffin of many a town centre.


    Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

    Nick Kew: A sacrifice on the altar

    Sat, 2014-06-21 17:37

    The Thugs’ Best Friend

    I had to spend a lot of time in Brighton over the autumn, winter and spring.  Just a few minutes walk from George Street in Hove, a satellite-town-centre shopping street.  George Street has long been pedestrianised during shopping hours, making it a pleasant place to go for one’s shopping, or for a refreshment at one of its many pubs or cafés.  The only fly in the ointment was that on Sundays it was open to cars, turning it from a pleasant place to a stressful no-go area.

    This winter was different.  I went there several times during regular weekday shopping hours, only to find it infested by cars.  After a little while I learned to treat it as a no-go area at all times.  A sad loss: there’s no comparable shopping street for some distance.  I don’t know why such a street has been sacrificed.  The local council is run by the Green Party: perhaps they’re as false to their roots as all the rest, but even so this seems extraordinary.

    Today’s news: our towns are yet again to be sacrificed on the altar of the Great God motorcar.  This time it’s parking, and no matter how much commonsense and/or the law want to save an area for people, councils are to be deprived of the practical means to enforce anything.  Of course the propagandists wheeled out several motorists with legitimate-sounding horror stories of having been fined unreasonably, yet none of those were caught by the enforcement systems they’re banning!

    The thugs’ best friend has struck another blow against humanity, and no doubt driven another nail into the coffin of many a town centre.


    Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

    Justin Mason: Links for 2014-06-20

    Fri, 2014-06-20 18:58
    Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

    Paul Querna: Announcing Rackspace OnMetal

    Fri, 2014-06-20 15:20

    My secret project has been announced: Rackspace OnMetal Cloud Servers.

    What is OnMetal?

    OnMetal is bare metal servers via the OpenStack Nova API. These servers contain no hypervisor or other abstraction when your operating is running on them -- they are bare metal, and available over an API. They have utility billing and other attributes of cloud servers, but are single tenant up to the top of rack switch. The underlying product is built on top of OpenStack Ironic and Open Compute Servers.

    I have spent the last decade building software deployed into combinations of colocation and cloud infrastructures. They all sucked in their own special ways. This product is about taking the dynamic advantages of cloud and combining it with the performance and economics of colocation.

    I want to learn more! What are the OnMetal instance specifications?

    Each instance is specialized for a specific task:


    Instance Type CPU RAM IO OnMetal IO v1 2x 2.8Ghz 10 core E5-2680v2 Xeon 128GB 2x LSI Nytro WarpDrive BLP4-1600(1.6TB) and Boot device (32G SATADOM). OnMetal Memory v1 2x 2.6Ghz 6 core E5-2630v2 Xeon 512GB Boot device only. (32G SATADOM) OnMetal Compute v1 1x 2.8Ghz 10 core E5-2680v2 Xeon 32GB Boot device only. (32G SATADOM)

    While I am a believer in the eventual winning of Mesos-like scheduling systems, the reality of today is that developers want extreme mixes of server profiles. OnMetal provides this with an IO instance with 3.2TB of Flash Storage, a Memory instance with 512GB of RAM, and an economical compute instance with 10 fast cores and lots of network.

    Additionally each instance has dual 10 gigabit network connections in a high availability MLAG.

    When can I get it?

    OnMetal is currently in an “early access” program. General Availability is expected by the end of July 2014.

    How do I use it?

    The instances are just another flavor type in the Rackspace Public Cloud API -- you just pass in onmetal-io-v1 instead of performance2-120 as the flavor type, and it shows up, just like a virtualized cloud server would.

    How much do these instances cost?

    We are not releasing pricing yet. Soon™.

    Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

    Colm O hEigeartaigh: Apache CXF Fediz 1.1.1 released

    Fri, 2014-06-20 06:31
    Apache CXF Fediz 1.1.1 and 1.0.4 have been released. Fediz is a subproject of Apache CXF which implements the WS-Federation Passive Requestor Profile. It allows you to secure web applications using Single Sign-On (SSO) and Claims Based Access Control (CBAC), by redirecting users to an IdP (Identity Provider) for authentication, which in turn leverages the CXF STS (SecurityTokenService). Plugins are provided for the most popular web application containers, such as Apache Tomcat, Jetty, Spring, etc.

    The 1.0.4 release  upgrades the underlying CXF dependency from 2.6.6 to 2.6.14, and the 1.1.1 release upgrades CXF from 2.7.7 to 2.7.11, thus picking up important bug fixes. Fediz 1.0.4 adds support for the wauth + whr parameters, while Fediz 1.1.1 adds support for wreq (see section 1.d below) and the older WS-Policy namespace, along with a few other bug fixes. See the Fediz JIRA for more information.
    1) Fediz example

    In a previous post introducing Apache CXF Fediz I gave instructions about how to deploy one of the Fediz 1.0.x examples to Apache Tomcat. In this section, I will update the deployment instructions for Fediz 1.1.1, as the examples have changed slightly since 1.0.x. In addition, I will give a simple example about how to use the new support for the "wreq" parameter added in Fediz 1.1.1 as part of FEDIZ-84 to request a SAML 1.1 token from the IdP.

    Download the latest Apache CXF Fediz release (currently 1.1.1) here, and extract it to a new directory (${fediz.home}). It ships with two examples, 'simpleWebapp' and 'wsclientWebapp'. We will cover the former as part of this tutorial. We will use a Apache Tomcat 7 container to host both the Idp/STS and service application - this is not recommended, but is an easy way to get the example to work. Please see the associated README.txt of the simpleWebapp example for more information about how to deploy the example properly. Most of the deployment information in this section is based on the Fediz Tomcat documentation, which I recommend reading for a more in-depth treatment of deploying Fediz to Tomcat.

    a) Deploying the IdP/STS

    To deploy the Idp/STS to Tomcat:
    • Create a new directory: ${catalina.home}/lib/fediz
    • Edit ${catalina.home}/conf/catalina.properties and append ',${catalina.home}/lib/fediz/*.jar' to the 'common.loader' property.
    • Copy ${fediz.home}/plugins/tomcat/lib/* to ${catalina.home}/lib/fediz
    • Copy ${fediz.home}/idp/war/* to ${catalina.home}/webapps
    Now we need to set up TLS:
    • Copy ${fediz.home}/examples/samplekeys/idp-ssl-server.jks to ${catalina.home}.
    • Edit the TLS Connector in ${catalina.home}/conf/server.xml', e.g.: <Connector port="8443" protocol="HTTP/1.1" SSLEnabled="true" maxThreads="150" scheme="https" secure="true" keystoreFile="idp-ssl-server.jks" keystorePass="tompass" clientAuth="false" sslProtocol="TLS" URIEncoding="UTF-8"  />
    Now start Tomcat, and check that the STS is live by opening the STS WSDL in a web browser: 'https://localhost:8443/fediz-idp-sts/REALMA/STSServiceTransport?wsdl'

    b) Deploying the service

    To deploy the service to Tomcat:
    • Copy ${fediz.home}/examples/samplekeys/rp-ssl-server.jks and ${fediz.home}/examples/samplekeys/ststrust.jks to ${catalina.home}.
    • Copy ${fediz.home}/examples/simpleWebapp/src/main/config/fediz_config.xml to ${catalina.home}/conf/
    • Edit ${catalina.home}/conf/fediz_config.xml and replace '9443' with '8443'.
    • Do a "mvn clean install" in ${fediz.home}/examples/simpleWebapp
    • Copy ${fediz.home}/examples/simpleWebapp/target/fedizhelloworld.war to ${catalina.home}/webapps.
    c) Testing the service

    To test the service navigate to:
    • https://localhost:8443/fedizhelloworld/  (this is not secured) 
    • https://localhost:8443/fedizhelloworld/secure/fedservlet
    With the latter URL, the browser is redirected to the IDP (select realm "A") and is prompted for a username and password. Enter "alice/ecila" or "bob/bob" or "ted/det" to test the various roles that are associated with these username/password pairs.

    Finally, you can see the metadata of the service via the standard URL:
    • https://localhost:8443/fedizhelloworld/FederationMetadata/2007-06/FederationMetadata.xml 
    d) Obtaining a SAML 1.1 token via wreq

    Let's assume that the Service Provider can only handle SAML 1.1 tokens. Fediz 1.1.1 supports this by allowing the service provider to configure a "request" parameter to send a WS-Trust RequestSecurityToken Element to the IdP containing a desired TokenType. To update the example above to obtain a SAML 1.1 token instead of a SAML 2.0 token do the following:
    • Update ${catalina.home}/conf/fediz_config.xml + add the following to the "protocol" section: <request type="String">&lt;RequestSecurityToken xmlns=&quot;http://docs.oasis-open.org/ws-sx/ws-trust/200512&quot;&gt;&lt;TokenType&gt;http://docs.oasis-open.org/wss/oasis-wss-saml-token-profile-1.1#SAMLV1.1&lt;/TokenType&gt;&lt;/RequestSecurityToken&gt;</request>
    Now simply follow the same steps as before in accessing 'fedizhelloworld/secure/fedservlet' in a browser. You will see that the Bootstrap token that appears on the final screen is now a SAML 1.1 token.
    Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

    Justin Mason: Links for 2014-06-19

    Thu, 2014-06-19 18:58
    Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

    David E. Jones: Why I Work Without Pay on Free Software: Flow and Autotelic Creative Work

    Thu, 2014-06-19 12:02
    An Unexpected Experience of Flow
    It was a hot day and I was sweaty from walking off the tension of a meeting that hadn't gone well. My thoughts at the beginning of the walk were scattered and disorganized, running through random details of the troubled project I had recently stepped up to manage. The effort to evaluate the project was bringing in more bad news every day. Complex issues and insufficient support for off-shore developers caused compounding delays in delivery. The project was expensive and critical to the future success and value of the organization. Pressure was high. By the end of the walk I remembered that none of these were new or unique problems, and I knew a few possible ways to address each one. I was still new in the position so while pressure overall was high I still had some time to get the project on a better course.

    Feeling more calm I sat down to review the messages that had come in through the night and check on the status of the few dozen highest priority tasks. My mind jumped all over as I scanned through messages and tasks to get an idea of what was stuck and needed to be clarified and delegated. I felt stressed and scattered as I worked to wrap my head around it all. For so many of the blocked tasks I felt frustrated with no obvious answer of who to delegate them to. With so many of the issues no obvious solution came to mind.

    Eventually I had scanned through all of them and sat back to consider the most important priorities of the project. I started to feel more relaxed and saw the big picture made up of all these little parts. I suddenly knew which stuck task to address first, just who to delegate it to, and what to write about how to approach the task. That done I jumped to the next task that a solution came to mind for, then to a message where a good answer to the question suddenly became clear.

    Some time later I looked at the clock on my laptop and was surprised to see that almost two hours had passed. I didn't remember hearing any of the noise in the busy office, even though I was in an open cubicle. I had been interrupted a few times by people stopping by, but even those conversations seemed to fit in fine with what I was working on, and a couple even allowed me to address email messages in person instead of by written reply. I felt content and satisfied, even happy. I was no longer focused and the answers were no longer flowing, but it was okay. My mind felt somewhat empty. I sat for a moment and spaced out, and it felt nice.

    As I got up to see who was interested in heading out for lunch I realized I had just experienced a deep flow. I was surprised because the conditions for it were so different from the quiet, focused, unpaid free software development work where I usually experience flow. This wasn't development work breaking down details of a single well defined goal, and not even a type of work that I particularly enjoy. It wasn't something I chose to do for its own sake, just something that had to be done. Still, the goal of the effort was clear as was the general purpose that the goal fit into. It wasn't a purpose I cared about deeply for its own sake, it was a paid effort, but the purpose was clear and I was part of making it happen. There wasn't a single task to focus on, and I didn't get to choose the tasks, but I did have flexibility over the order in which to handle the tasks. I also had control over how to handle each one, and at this point had a good enough knowledge of the project and the team so that along with general experience the challenge at hand was fairly level with my ability.

    Not only did I get through far more in the morning than I had anticipated, and had felt stress about not staying on top of, but my tense and frustrating morning had turned into a pleasant and fulfilling experience. I was full of energy, ready to enjoy a lunch with colleagues, and well prepared to get through the many hours of planned meetings and moving along important objectives that remained in the day. I marveled at the power of flow. I mused over the wide variety of work that could be autotelic, that could be enjoyable and rewarding on its own enough to be intrinsically motivating and not just as part of a bigger external purpose or for extrinsic motivations.

    My Free Software Based Career
    In 2001 I started The Open For Business Project, now Apache OFBiz, a suite of ERP, CRM, and eCommerce applications (http://ofbiz.apache.org). Between then and 2010 I worked around 8,000 hours on it without pay. I then started a series of new free software projects that are a redesign and fresh implementation of a scope similar to OFBiz: Moqui Framework, Mantle Business Artifacts, and various other projects based on them (http://www.moqui.org). I have worked around 2,500 hours without pay on these projects, and anticipate thousands more.

    Why would any sane person do such a thing? Setting aside the question of sanity, what about the whole issue of earning income for personal needs, family obligations and funding ventures? On top of all that I am a normal person with a wide variety of interests that require time and money such as off-grid living, exploring the wilderness on foot and motorcycle, constant reading and learning, meditation and mindful living, health and fitness, and even a little romance here and there.

    When I started OFBiz my main motivation was to create something that filled a need I had seen in the two failed startups I had just worked for, and do so in a way that I could build a long-term career on it. Building commercial software does not qualify because if you part ways or the company goes under you can no longer effectively leverage the software you worked on in future contracts or business ventures. It is great to be paid to build something, but even better to build something that you can continue to use and improve no matter where you are working, or if you are working (for money).

    These free software projects have been a great foundation for a career in enterprise software consulting. I have worked for some of the largest companies in the world, for fascinating and innovative startups, and everything in between. I have experienced business and culture many corners of North and Central America, Europe, and Asia. I have enjoyed a high level of independence and a good amount of work coming in through the free software projects, so I never really had to market myself in other ways. I get to work on the design and development of software that I am good at and enjoy, and not so much on the marketing and sales that I am neither good at nor enjoy very much, and yet still work as an independent consultant or in various incarnations of consulting organizations that I have tried over the years.

    While these extrinsic motivators are great they are more of a side-effect and what it all comes down to is drive, to intrinsic motivation. This is not just something that drives me to work the long hours necessary for large and complex software projects, but is something that makes the work rewarding for its own sake. It is a powerful thing to experience the flow and satisfaction that comes from the combination of autonomy (of time, task, and team), challenge that often goes just beyond my existing skill and knowledge, and fulfillment in pursuing a greater purpose. These three are key to experiencing flow in creative efforts.

    Doing creative work in a state of flow is both rewarding (pleasurable and satisfying) and nearly always results in effective, efficient work with excellent results. Working on free software projects benefits from a natural sense of purpose, frequent satisfying challenges, and a high level of autonomy. The experience of flow on free software or other more autonomous creative work carries over into day to day necessary work as well. People learn to get into flow and leverage it for improved results and satisfaction. This is one of the reasons why organizations allowing 20% time to work on whatever employees want see greater innovation and productivity overall.

    So why do I work on free software? It is a foundation for a career, but more importantly it is something that I can tap frequently for the experience of flow. On the income side of things, it is easier to get into flow doing paid work based on the free software projects that I work on and in the ever growing set of business contexts that I am familiar with. This carries over into paid work and makes it easier for me to get into flow on those efforts. I pursue flow in other experiences like riding a motorcycle in the wilderness, adjusting speed and choosing terrain to challenge and engage myself just beyond my comfort zone (which varies day to day, and even during a ride), but the experience of flow in the context of a larger purpose and creative effort is far more satisfying and rewarding.

    Books and Background
    The best book for an introduction to the topic of intrinsic motivation and flow is:

    Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel H. Pink
    http://www.amazon.com/Drive-Surprising-Truth-About-Motivates/dp/1594484805

    On an interesting side note this book features various stories about Atlassian, the company behind Jira, Confluence, and other software commonly used in projects based on OFBiz, and many software development projects in general these days. Atlassian has a policy of 20% time to work on anything desired, and various other policies that help foster and enable flow. There is some historical overlap between OFBiz and Jira, and Jira uses a customized version the Entity Engine from OFBiz.

    For those interested in extreme sports and human performance in general, this is a great book:

    The Rise of Superman: Decoding the Science of Ultimate Human Performance by Steven Kotler
    http://www.amazon.com/The-Rise-Superman-Decoding-Performance/dp/1477800832

    See also the Flow Genome Project (http://www.flowgenomeproject.co) which is based on this work, and in particular a great slideshow they put together that describes the concept of flow and trigger for it:

    http://www.slideshare.net/StevenKotler/17-flow-triggers

    Much of this is based on the extensive work of Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi. His most business-oriented book is:

    Good Business: Leadership, Flow, and the Making of Meaning by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
    http://www.amazon.com/Good-Business-Leadership-Making-Meaning-ebook/dp/B002J05GPS

    For those who want to go deeper he has written various other books, and these are a couple of good ones to look into:

    Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
    http://www.amazon.com/Flow-The-Psychology-Optimal-Experience/dp/0061339202

    Creativity: The Psychology of Discovery and Invention by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
    http://www.amazon.com/Creativity-The-Psychology-Discovery-Invention/dp/0062283251

    The Experience of Flow
    Flow is a powerful experience of full engagement and focus. It is a state of consciousness, attention, and awareness focused on a particular activity. The parts of the mind and body that are essential for the activity are fully engaged while the remaining parts of the mind and body are suppressed.

    There are many aspects of the experience and the resources above have much information about not only what people experience, but also correlated changes in brain chemistry and electrical (wave) state and areas of the brain that activate and (more importantly) deactivate. One aspect is that time perception changes, usually a sense of time slowing down or simply no awareness of the passing of time. This correlates with transient hypofrontality, or more specifically change or suppression of the parts of the brain that monitor time and control your perception of it.

    In some flow experiences even the parts of your mind that perceive your self will change and the boundary between what is you and what is not you will shift. In some experiences a tool may seem to become part of you so that no conscious effort is required to use the tool, it is like it is part of you. In other experiences you may feel more connected to the environment or to people around you, as if you are part of a greater whole (and this is an important aspect of team flow... yes, people can flow in groups too!).

    The most critical aspect of flow is that self evaluation, your inner critic, turns off. You experience no value judgment and confidence becomes a non-question... the part of your brain that might doubt is simply turned off. Impulse control goes away along with activation of impulse focus on the task at hand. This feels like a steady stream of impulse and action based on impulse, a literal flow of continual impulse and action.

    In a creative effort the parts of the brain that are then able to impulse and flow include the parts related to pattern recognition, linking ideas together, generating new ideas, risk taking, and detailed memory of the experience. When needed for the task there may also be increases in awareness, observation, and input acceptance and processing.

    That is all the performance side of the experience, which will generally result in extrinsic rewards, but what about the intrinsic rewards? This is where the real motivation for the experience kicks in. During and following flow experiences the brain has an increase in norepinepherine, dopamine, serotonin, and endorphins. It is like being on low levels of speed, cocaine, MDMA, and opiates all at once... but totally natural. It is part of your mind's built in reward for your efforts in learning, growing, creating, and unleashing cultivated abilities.

    To Flow and Beyond
    There are steps before and after flow that you should be aware of to understand how flow fits into the overall creative experience (and other flow experiences as well). Below are descriptions of the 4 main phases. Chances are you will recognize these from past creative and other experiences, and understanding them you can start to recognize them in future experiences.

    1. Struggle: When first beginning an effort you have a lot of mental noise and scattered thoughts jumping among the value,  purpose, and details of what you are doing. This is the phase to load relevant information into your mind by reading or conversing, to recall relevant information, and think about the goal you are trying to accomplish and the purpose of the effort. This is a necessary preparation for flow even if it does sometimes seem unpleasant. The inner critic that turns off during flow is active during the struggle phase. The dominant brain wave in this phase is the beta wave, and the most prominent chemicals in your mind are cortisol and norepinepherine. Focus your intentional effort on loading information and setting a clear goal and vision to reach that goal.

    2. Clarity: In this phase the specific goal and vision for reaching the goal become more clear and you start to get your head around what you are trying to do. This is a key part of getting into flow and is the stage just before flow. If you don't have a clear enough vision of the effort you will never reach this phase and never transition into the flow phase. This phase may be brief or may last a while. To get here you need to relax and move your attention away from your thinking mind to let your mind do its thing. Intentional breathing, physical activity, or a simple distraction can help with this. You will eventually have a clear vision (not necessarily an image) of the goal, and what you need to do first becomes clear. Don't try to think through the whole effort in detail, just get the vision and the first step clear then start acting. Flow is all about engaging in that first step and letting the remaining steps "flow". What is literally happening is various parts of your mind are now doing the tasks you setup in phase 1 and coordinating with your conscious mind as needed by raising impulses for you to act on. Just focus on the first step of your effort, and let the rest come as you go. The prominent brain wave here is the alpha wave, and in this phase nitric oxide in the blood stream starts to increase, which in turn increases blood flow and the delivery of various chemicals to the brain that it needs to function optimally.

    3. Flow: This is where the magic happens and you experience everything described in the previous section of this article. You start to feel fully conscious (associated with theta brain waves) and at the same time various parts of your mind become active while other parts of the mind that normally suppress these active parts become inactive (the inner critic turns off, time perception changes, etc). Most of the creative work moves to the background of your mind, your subconscious, leaving your conscious mind to act. You will start to efficiently process information and have more frequent and profound insights, which are associated with gamma brain waves. The more you can focus on the effort and let impulse and action flow the longer you will stay in this phase. This can be done with other people. Sometimes things others say and do will become a part of your flow, sometimes they will break your flow.

    4. Detach and Recover: This phase always happens, and it is best if you allow the time and space for it instead of getting distracted or moving on immediately to something else. You need this phase to recover and learn from the effort, and to prepare for future flow. In this phase you may feel totally spaced out, empty minded. Your mind goes into this state as a natural way to recover from, and process what, happened during the flow phase. When your whole mind is focused on a certain task there may be memories, emotions, sensations, and observations that some part of your mind notices but that don't result in an impulse to your conscious mind because they are not relevant to the effort at hand. Those may come out during this phase. The prominent brain wave in this phase is the delta wave, and both serotonin and oxytocin may be elevated. This can be a very pleasant phase but can also be a let down from the high of flow. Either way it is a valuable phase for learning from your experience and preparing for the next time you do it. For those who meditate this is an excellent time to intentionally be mindful of what is going on in your mind and body. Your whole physiology is primed for mindful meditation in this phase, and doing so will maximize the benefits and the enjoyment that come from it.

    Finding Flow
    That sounds like a great experience, what can I do to get into flow, especially when doing something creative like developing software?

    Ultimately flow is a mental state, something your mind does to respond to focused, high value effort. You can't force flow, but there is a lot you can do to create the conditions for it, to train yourself to more readily go into and stay in flow, and even change your brain chemistry and electrical state to facilitate it.

    The Flow Genome Project has a list of 17 flow triggers, and there are three that are most critical to software development and similar creative efforts:

    1. Sense of Control (autonomy + competence): Autonomy is all about independence and choice in the effort. The three main aspects of autonomy are time (when to do it, how long to spend doing it), task (what to do, how to do it), and team (who to do it with). Different people will consider different of these to be most important, and will be affected in terms of flow differently by each type of autonomy. Competence is the other side of the sense of control. With a higher level of experience and competence it is easier to get to a vision for how to go about the goal, and it is easier to quiet the inner critic that can block flow.

    2. Strong Purpose and Clear Goal(s): A purpose that you care about will naturally engage you more. The more clear a goal is the more easily you will be able to put together a vision for reaching the goal and identify the first step to get there. The goal and your vision for achieving it is likely to change during an effort, and while it doesn't need to be perfect or even fully complete you need something to start with.

    3. Challenge/Skills Ratio: For anything you might do you have a range of challenge (or intensity or stress) that you will handle well. There is a low end to this range below which you will have difficulty getting and remaining fully engaged. In other words you'll get bored and more easily distracted, it will be difficult to remain focused. There is a high end above which your skill and experience are not adequate and you will feel overwhelmed and doubtful or even fearful. The sweet spot, where it is most easy to get into flow, is a challenge level that is just a bit higher than your comfortable skill level. Flow happens best when you are fully engaged and this happens most naturally when you push yourself to new levels of performance and achievement.

    Given these important conditions for getting into flow, how can you train and improve your ability to do so? One of the most powerful practices is meditation. The ability to be fully present in both time and place, focusing on the here and now, is cultivated with meditation and with practicing presence in everything you do. Even planning for the future or pondering the past can be done fully present, just chose the moments and focus on those things. If conditions are ideal for flow then it doesn't matter so much as your mind will shift into full presence, but it is much easier to learn to be present than to always try to setup perfect conditions or be limited to the perfect conditions. Being present reduces the impact of lack of control (both lack of autonomy and lack of competence), makes it easier to accept and embrace purposes and goals, quiets your internal critic, and widens the range of challenge that you will handle well.

    When a challenge is well beneath your ability level increasing your attention will keep you engaged and present even though the intensity of the challenge doesn't push you there. When a challenge is beyond your comfortable ability being present will keep your mind from running to all the possible horrible outcomes, or the failures of the past. This is the essence of equanimity which is cultivated through meditation, various other mindfulness practices, and practicing presence and attention in everything you do. The ultimate experience of meditation is to detach your consciousness from your thinking mind, body, and emotions so that they are all in the background and your conscious mind is aware of them but not controlled by, or attached to, them. Creative flow is like a meditative experience in that you are more conscious and present in both, and being familiar with conscious awareness will help you get into flow.

    One good book to get you started, if you are not already familiar with meditation, is:

    Mindfulness Meditation in Everyday Life and Exercises & Meditations by Jon Kabat-Zinn
    http://www.amazon.com/Mindfulness-Meditation-Everyday-Exercises-Meditations/dp/149151891X

    Another tool that appears to have great potential, but that I have not personally tried, is neurofeedback training such as Brain Sport by SenseLabs (was Neurotopia).

    Okay, that's great as an ideal, but what do I do to function effectively now while I'm practicing meditation and getting into flow? Be careful not to force flow, the extra stress will actually block it. Still, there is quite a bit you can do to "hack" flow. For example if a challenge is too easy you might intentionally make it more difficult, closer to the edge of your skill level, by doing it more elaborately, constraining it in some way (limit on time, size of result, etc), or even doing something passive at the same time such as listening to music or doing something physical (walking, stretching, etc). If a challenge is well beyond your skill level you can get help, train or study before you take it on, or identify the critical success factors and see if you can simplify the effort to something closer to the comfortable edge of your skill level.

    A lack of autonomy or feeling of competence, or a purpose or goal that don't interest you, are a very different sort of challenge. These become exercises in acceptance. Acceptance is not about going along with things that are harmful to you or others, those are cases where you need to decide to be involved or not and what to do to set and enforce boundaries. Acceptance is about coming to terms with reality, letting reality be what it is without getting upset about it, and even without getting excited or happy about it. Just accept it for what it is, notice it in detail without any value judgment.

    Once you understand a situation, internal or external, and are okay emotionally with what it is, then you can decide what to do with it and examine your feelings about it. By accepting a lack of autonomy and looking at the situation for what it is, you may find desire and fulfillment in the effort, and be able to flow fully with it even though it isn't ideal. By accepting a purpose or goal that doesn't interest you or even that seems undesirable at first, you may be able to see it and understand all aspects of it more clearly and start to feel interested and excited about it. It is natural when accepting something to be able to notice it more clearly, and natural when noticing something clearly to appreciate it for what it is and even feel gratitude and desire about it.

    What if I want to get a boost while I'm doing inner work to be able to more fully and frequently flow? One way to suppress some of the same parts of your mind that are suppressed during flow is to use a tDCS device like the "foc.us gamer". This is a useful tool for concentration and can help with focus and turning off the inner critic, which can make it easier to get through the struggle phase into the clarity phase, which is often the most difficult part of getting into flow.

    Another physical tool to help get into flow is nitric oxide (NO) boosting supplements. Nitric oxide naturally increases in the clarity phase and helps transition to the flow phase by increasing blood flow and delivering more of certain chemicals in the brain. There is a lot of research about nitric oxide and its role in mental and physical performance. There are common parts of fitness supplements that act as NO boosters such as L-Arginine and L-Citrulline. There are also more natural things that increase NO, including green leafy edibles, beets, garlic, cayenne, and good old fashioned exercise.

    In general anything you can do to get the goal and details about it into your head, produce a vision for the effort, and focus intensely on the effort will help you get into flow. If you know a way to quiet the chatter in your mind effectively and safely then try that to help you get into flow. If you know ways to tune the intensity of a challenge to your skill and full engagement level, give it a try. Improving your ability to flow and the conditions for flow may involve working with others. These may be family, friends, or coworkers. Consider it an opportunity to improve your relationship with them, and maybe even get them interested in flow, presence, acceptance, and other things that will benefit them personally and professionally.

    Breaking Down Goals for Ideal Flow
    Software development involves lots of breaking down bigger goals into specific instructions and algorithm steps that a machine can execute. In a way it is ideal for getting into flow. Once you understand the goal and a general strategy for getting a machine to do that using whatever tools you have available you can get into the procedural flow of laying down one step at a time. Over time your mind gets so used to processes and rules that once you have the general idea of what needs to be done it is almost automatic for your mind to start breaking it down into structural and procedural chunks. Your mind trains well to send you a steady stream of impulses for you to act on as you tap out code.

    For many of us this mental effort becomes so automatic that we can do it in spite of high pressure and distractions. We can also recover quickly and get back into flow after running into dilemmas and having to step back and observe the problem as a whole for a bit. In fact, we even get good at hopping between different levels of detail to work with higher and lower level processes and data structures and such, and getting into flow at varying levels of abstraction. There is a reason that once we develop some sound skill that we often thoroughly enjoy creating software.

    What about higher level things, like gathering business requirements and designing user interfaces and other software development tasks where we don't have a nice clearly defined goal to work toward? What about when the task is to clearly define the actual implementation goals like screen designs, data structures, or business rules?

    This is where levels of abstraction come into play. Business requirements are in effect just a high level, low detail abstraction of the software to eventually create, and preferably written in business terms as opposed to technical terms. Business requirements still live in the context of even higher level business objectives and rules. If you are using effective means of structuring and documenting requirements (such as those in HEMP, http://www.dejc.com/HEMP) then it will become a natural level of abstraction that you work with just as effectively and efficiently as code. It is a different sort of effort from coding as it is (or generally should be) a collaborative effort with business representatives. The potential when gathering requirements is to frame and direct the conversation in such a way that the whole group focuses on particular business objectives and processes and the whole group gets into flow together laying out the details of the business process.

    Flow can be experienced in a wide variety of efforts. Even writing this article involved a few distinct periods of flow! Any large project or effort can be broken down into smaller efforts, some of which are efforts to define and break down the larger efforts. Over time breaking down larger efforts to optimize the opportunity for flow with each effort will be a natural part of your work planning and one of your flow facilitating skills.

    Getting Started
    Now you know what flow is and what to look for as you experience different phases of efforts leading up to flow, engaging in flow, and the detaching and recovering from flow. The best way to get started is to simply be more aware, start looking for the phases, sensations, and feelings of flow. Chances are you have experienced flow hundreds of times in your life, and maybe a few times as profound, sustained experiences that you recall clearly. Take a moment to sit in those memories and recall what it felt like, how you got there, similar experiences where it didn't work and what was different that got you fully engaged, present, and focused. In addition to experiencing flow in your work life and creative pursuits you can also experience it in personal efforts like pushing your limits in fitness or physical expression. Paying close attention to what you are doing and the sensations you feel as you do so can be a profound and euphoric experience as you get into flow, and as you get out of it.

    You have also most likely had experiences of flow with other people, in personal or professional efforts. Those are special and powerful experiences, and teams that do this on a regular basis do amazing things and get profound satisfaction and fulfillment from it along the way. This is one thing people really enjoy about performing music, dancing, and other activities that involve people synchronizing and coordinating with constant engagement and feedback. In a business context this happens a lot during process-driven requirements gathering where people are focused on the overall business objective and work together to layout the steps to achieve it. It also happens during technical problem solving.

    You can flow in a wide variety of efforts and circumstances, and some lend themselves to flow more than others. Practicing and enjoying flow in efforts that lend themselves to it will make it easier to get into flow in efforts where the conditions are less than ideal. These are often important things to do, critical for business operations and even certain parts of creative efforts and collaboration, and you can do them better and enjoy them more in flow. The experience may be one day a week where you work on whatever you want, in whatever way you want, for your employer. It may be unpaid contribution to free software projects like I have chosen, but it doesn't have to be, and it doesn't even have to be unpaid. The key is to set up the effort to use the triggers and follow the process for getting into flow.

    Remember that going into flow states for important efforts is a natural part of the function and structure of your mind and body. Important is whatever you decide it is, or more accurately, whatever you tell your mind is important. You get to decide. Flow is the ideal way to learn and grow, to create and express, and your mind and body will reward you well for it.

    Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

    Matt Raible: Father's Day Weekend on The Arkansas River

    Thu, 2014-06-19 09:53

    I really enjoy being a father. I consider it one of my greatest responsibilities, one that has many rewards. There's nothing like hearing your son say "Dad, I'm really glad you made me go on this trip" (on our Yampa trip) or your daughter making you a Happy Father's Day book that says "you invented FUN!" Like many years in the past, we celebrated Father's Day Weekend with a camping trip.

    Trish and I both invited our Dad's to join us, and they delightfully agreed. Trish transported her Dad to Denver by flying to Pennsylvania last Wednesday and road-tripping back with him. I flew my Dad in and picked him up from the airport Friday afternoon. We had a bit of road-tripping ourselves, with a drive to Fort Collins (to pick up our enhanced Syncro), then to Winter Park (to pick up our raft), then back to Denver.

    Saturday morning, we packed up our sleeping bags, life jackets and border collies and drove to the Cotopaxi KOA on the Arkansas River. We arrived late afternoon, and were quickly impressed with the KOA's glamping attributes. We had an excellent riverside spot, with RV hookups for the van and a sweet concrete patio. We enjoyed a wagon ride, frisbee, fishing, and marshmallows by the fire before retiring for the night.

    On Father's Day, we rafted the Upper Bighorn Sheep Canyon, putting in at Salida East and taking out at Vallie Bridge. The rapids wild and wet, but easy to navigate. Our favorite was Tin Cup Rapid; it was sloped like a bunny hill, with a nice big wave at the bottom.

    On the way home, we stopped to see the Royal Gorge. We were disappointed to find "America's Highest Bridge" was closed. Later, we found out on June 11, 2013, they suffered extensive damage caused by the Royal Gorge Fire. This wildfire destroyed 48 of the 52 structures on the Bridge & Park grounds, including their Aerial Tram and antique carousel, as well as the park's visitor center. Trish snapped some good photos of the kids while we marveled at the view.

    After the Royal Gorge, we drove to Colorado Springs and stopped to see the '66 Bus Project. The brakes, clutch, accelerator and shift linkage is all installed. Now they're working on custom fitting the back seat and air tank (for the air bags). There's a good chance it'll be able to start and drive by the end of the month.

    Speaking of Volkswagens, we got some new bumpers installed on our Syncro last week by Rocky Mountain Westy. Coupled with a new set of tires, the ol' van is looking pretty good these days.

    Thanks to our Dads for making the journey to see us and spend such an awesome weekend together. You both are always fun to hang out with. We can't wait to do it again soon!

    For a more extensive picture collection from this weekend, see Trish's 2014 Father's Day Weekend album.

    Past Father's Day Trips:

    Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

    Bryan Pendleton: MLS and the vanishing spray

    Thu, 2014-06-19 09:00

    Many of my friends were surprised when the referees began pulling out the vanishing spray.

    But it's been used in MLS for some time now, so we Yankee fans were not startled at all; we think it's a great tool.

    Of course, we Yankee fans like technology in our sports. I guess that's just how we roll.

    Anyway: World Cup: What Is That Foaming Spray Used by Refs?

    The vanishing spray contains a mixture of butane, isobutane and propane gas; a foaming agent; water; and other chemicals. When it leaves the can, the gas depressurizes and expands, creating small, water-covered droplets on the field. The butane mixture later evaporates, leaving only water and surfactant residue behind.

    You can see the patent, too.

    A foaming composition for generating temporary indications, preferably to mark defensive wall lines and spots for free kick shootout in football, where the foam remains stable over a very short but sufficient period of time to take the shot, wherein the composition comprises a propellant, a foaming emulsifier, a cation chelating agent, a preservative and water.
    Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

    Justin Mason: Links for 2014-06-18

    Wed, 2014-06-18 18:58
    Categories: FLOSS Project Planets