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digiKam Recipes 4.5.1 Released

Mon, 2015-03-23 03:35

A freshly-baked release of digiKam Recipes is ready for your reading pleasure. The new version features the Export and Share Photos with digiKam recipe which offers a comprehensive overview of digiKam's sharing and exporting capabilities.

The new Extract and Examine Metadata from digiKam's Database recipe explains how to pull and analyze photographic metadata stored in the digikam4.db database. Finally, the Rescale Photos with the Liquid Rescale Tool recipe explains how to use the Liquid Rescale tool for intelligent rescaling. As always, the new release includes minor updates, fixes and tweaks.

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Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Submit your talk to Akademy 2015!

Sun, 2015-03-22 09:55

The Call for Papers deadline for Akademy 2015 is just 10 days away. So you should submit a talk now, you know you have cool stuff to share, so do a small write up and tell the world that awesome new stuff you're working on.

And of course don't forget to register as always it's free but let's us know how many of you nice people are going to come over ;)

Ah and we also have the badges available, thanks to Alba Carro for the nice pictures :)

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Akademy 2015 Call For Papers Reminder

Sun, 2015-03-22 09:46

The call for papers for Akademy 2015 is on the 31st of March, which is scarcely over a week away.

If you want to talk at Akademy it is important to submit your application on time.

We have a large number of short and lightning talks available again this year, which is a fantastic opportunity to give everyone a brief overview of what's been happening in your project over the past year. I would like to see every active project presenting something.

Don't leave it too late and miss out.

Instructions on how to submit can be found at https://akademy.kde.org/2015/cfp.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Ten Years of Kubuntu hits Hacker News

Sat, 2015-03-21 11:18

You can read and add your reactions at ycombinator, and add your vote. Also note that the full LWN article is now freely available,

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

The future of kdesrc-build packaging

Fri, 2015-03-20 21:59

The last official release of the kdesrc-build tool to build KDE was 1.15.1, nearly three years ago. For some perspective, this is when we were in the process of preparing KDE Software Compilation 4.9 for release, and nearly 2 years before the first technological preview of KDE Frameworks 5.

One could rightly suspect that the project had died entirely, but that is not true (though in fairness there have been large lapses in my time to provide maintenance and development). My periods of inattention were somewhat made up for by a small ecosystem that has sprouted up around kdesrc-build, including advice on how to use kdesrc-build, bash autocompletion scripts, and even a project (kdesrc-build-extra) that manages entire profiles for you to use with kdesrc-build, with a nice frontend to boot.

Either way, there have been nearly a half-thousand individual git commits to the kdesrc-build.git repository since the last release, including many bugfixes where I’ve faithfully recorded a “FIXED-IN: 1.16″ in preparation for a release that seemed like it would never be tagged.

Well, 1.16 itself is official at least, “v1.16″ being the official git tag for kdesrc-build.git commit a6f09a33. In fact this is where I would normally make a release announcement, but before I cover some of the things that have changed in 3 years, let me first explain how I intend to track kdesrc-build releases in the future.

Future release process

In short, starting with kdesrc-build 1.16, there will not be official “releases”. Instead, milestone versions will still be occasionally tagged, using the same version format that is becoming popular across open source, using the year and the month as the version. So kdesrc-build would jump from 1.16 to 15.04 (or perhaps 15.05).

Ever since the migration to git for KDE source repositories started really picking up steam, the recommended way to use kdesrc-build has been to run the git version of kdesrc-build directly. The sample KF5 configuration for kdesrc-build even pulls kdesrc-build itself from git (though you’d still need to remember to put it in your $PATH).

This was required at first due to the rapid changes required in kdesrc-build to support the rapid changes occurring in the KDE source repositories. Even as development later slowed on kdesrc-build itself, running kdesrc-build from git allowed KDE developers to push KF5 development by keeping the KF5 sample configurations up to date.

So the release process became redundant (indeed, I’ve had a bunch of feedback about kdesrc-build in the past few years, but not one single person has asked me to push an extra release). I will continue to periodically bump the version of the script itself using the time-based version format, but don’t expect formal releases any time soon.

Changes since 1.15.1

With all that said, if you’ve somehow managed to string 1.15.1 along up to this point, here’s some of the things you’d get when you upgrade to kdesrc-build.git (currently 1.16):

  • kdesrc-build can automatically include KDE project dependencies of modules into the build list. Gone are the days when you’d have to manually ask for ‘frameworks/*’ and then libkdemodule just so you could also build kdemodule/bar. Well, assuming that kde-build-metadata is kept up to date. :)
    To use, include the include-dependencies true option in a module-set that you wish to have dependencies included on, like

    module-set my-grouping repository kde-projects use-modules kate include-dependencies true end module-set

    You could also use --include-dependencies on the command line, and pass any modules you wished to build. You can even use options like --resume-from and --stop-after to further constrain the module list after dependency extraction.

  • Correctly use the bazaar source control tool to keep modules up to date (“kdesrc-build: We use bzr, so you don’t have to”).
  • Support for automatically selecting the right branch of a KDE module (assuming needed metadata is set in kde-build-metadata), based on a generic grouping of modules you wish to have (e.g. “stable KDE4″, “latest KF5-based applications”). This feature is essentially mandatory to using kdesrc-build today, but it didn’t exist in 1.15.1!
  • Better documentation, especially in –help. Note that I still need a lot of help here, despite all the words that are technically under the doc/ directory…
  • A lot of special-case handling code has been removed, since it’s been made redundant by better information in kde-build-metadata.
  • Tons more refactoring internally. This is intended to reduce the possibility of inadvertent lock-in to Perl, yet still no one else seems to want to port things… ;) In 1.15.1, kdesrc-build was effectively a giant single Perl file!
  • Support parsing a simplified dependency-data format, so that occasional logical moves of a git repository from one place to another don’t break all the dependencies. (e.g. if kcalc were to move to something like kf5/applications/base/kcalc.git, the dependencies wouldn’t have to change as kdesrc-build only cares about the ‘kcalc’ part at the end now).
  • Custom build commands are supported (this is essentially just to support the ‘ninja’ build tool).
  • Allow setting an HTTP proxy for downloads (and even to download Git modules over HTTP if needed).
  • Vim syntax highlighting (Kate’s syntax highlight is maintained in KTextEditor itself now).
  • Added support for building CMake itself, or autotools-based modules.
  • Added support for ‘catch-all’ dependencies to make it easy to say that e.g. all modules in ‘kde/*’ depend on ‘automoc’.
  • Allow including other configuration files from your kdesrc-buildrc, to let you create common sections to be shared with multiple kdesrc-buildrc files.
  • Vastly improved handling of options within kdesrc-buildrc, especially in module-sets, and especially in their interaction with command line flags.
  • Added a --print-modules command line option, which is effectively an even quicker “pretend mode” if all you need to know is what modules kdesrc-build thinks it would build. Very recently, --print-modules will indent modules in accordance with their dependencies (though only when kdesrc-build had to re-order the modules).
  • Likewise, added a --metadata-only command line option so that you can download the little bit of data needed to determine module lists without trying to build all of KDE repositories first (or having to Ctrl-C to exit).

There are many many more minor things as well, accumulated across the contributions of 32 other developers over the past few years. I hope that will continue over the next few years as well.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Coverity scan results for KF5

Fri, 2015-03-20 13:51
I have initiated coverity scan for 96 KF5 repositories out of 233 available to kdesrc-build. All the rest didn't build on my machine either because debian still ships Qt 5.3 or for some other reason. The scan has found 610 new defects, and there are more pre-existing ones that were found two years ago.

Please have a look at the results and fix defects that are in the code you know. If you still are not a member of 'KDE' project @scan.coverity.com please register there and send a membership request. Being a member means that you can mark defects as 'done' or 'false positive'.

I will retrigger scan in several weeks.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

KDE dinner in Berlin - April 11

Fri, 2015-03-20 05:09

In a few weeks (April 11-12) the KDE e.V. board is going to have an in-person board meeting in Berlin.

We board people have to eat from time to time and since we like talking to other people besides ourselves we’re organizing a dinner on Saturday 11 around 19:00 (location still undecided, suggestions accepted).

So if you are interested in talking about KDE, KDE e.V., Free Software, Open Source, or any other random talk and want to have a good time let me know that you're coming as soon as possible, space is limited.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Bluedevil 2.1.1 released

Thu, 2015-03-19 16:45

I am happy to announce a new Bluedevil release.

This is mainly a bugfix release with two minor new features. The first one is a new page in a pairing wizard. Instead of closing the wizard when it finishes, a success page is now shown to the user to indicate device setup was completed.
The other addition is a new warning message in KCM. Instead of "No Bluetooth adapters have been found." you will now see "Your Bluetooth adapter is powered off." when you actually have a Bluetooth adapter, but it is powered off.

This is also a last release of kdelibs4 Bluedevil.

What's next?
Bluedevil is now released as part of Plasma 5.
If everything goes by the plan, there will be bigger changes for Plasma 5.3 release. Bluedevil will use a new BluezQt library instead of libbluedevil. As BluezQt offers a QML API, I have also been working on a new Bluetooth plasmoid. The plasmoid's code is based on a network management plasmoid. It will probably need some new icons, but otherwise I think it looks quite good.

Here are some screenshots:

Expanded device details with action buttonsConnected devices are displayed in own section
Bugs fixed in 2.1.1:

  • don't try to infinitely kill monolithic when it fails #343682
  • fix directly opening files from obexftp (eg. images in gwenview)
  • fix one crash in kded module #342581
  • fix obexftp browse files on old S60 devices #342259

Download:
bluedevil: bluedevil-2.1.1.tar.xz
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Fedora RPM: Automatic “Provides” for CMake projects packages

Thu, 2015-03-19 12:25

If you ever did any RPM packaging (not just on Fedora) you probably noticed that some SPEC files don’t use package names in BuildRequires fields but instead they refer to pkg-config module names, like this:

Name:           qt5-qtbase Version:        5.4.1 Release:        1%{?dist} ... BuildRequires: pkgconfig(dbus-1) BuildRequires: pkgconfig(fontconfig) BuildRequires: pkgconfig(gl) BuildRequires: pkgconfig(glib-2.0) BuildRequires: pkgconfig(gtk+-2.0) ...

This is achieved by the respective packages simply having these aliases as their Provides (for example dbus-devel package Provides: pkgconfig(dbus-1)). The Provides are extracted automatically by an RPM script when the package is being built which gave me an idea…what if we could do the same for CMake modules?

And so I’ve written a simple script for RPM which extracts CMake package name and version from the package config files installed to /usr/lib/cmake. Simply put it means that kf5-kcoreaddons-devel will have

Provides: cmake(KF5CoreAddons) = 5.8.0

and qt5-qtdeclarative-devel will have

Provides: cmake(Qt5Qml) = 5.4.1 Provides: cmake(Qt5Quick) = 5.4.1 Provides: cmake(Qt5QuickTest) = 5.4.1 Provides: cmake(Qt5QuickWidgets) = 5.4.1

…and all this happens automatically :-)

So, if you are packaging a CMake-based projects for Fedora you don’t have to wonder which package provides the needed dependencies but you can just use the name from find_package() in BuildRequires and be done with it.

Name: plasma-workspace Version: 5.2.1 Release: 6%{?dist} Summary: Plasma workspace, applications and applets ... BuildRequires: cmake(Qt5Widgets) cmake(Qt5Quick) cmake(Qt5QuickWidgets) cmake(Qt5Concurrent) cmake(Qt5Test) cmake(Qt5Script) cmake(Qt5Network) cmake(Qt5WebKitWidgets) BuildRequires: cmake(Phonon4Qt5) BuildRequires: cmake(KF5Plasma) cmake(KF5DocTools) cmake(KF5Runner) ... ...

Another advantage is that this makes it easier to automate dependencies extraction from CMakeLists because we will no longer have to bother with mapping the CMake names to package names (for reference I have wrote a script to mass-update dependencies of all our KDE Frameworks 5 packages in Fedora).

We have pushed the script into Fedora’s cmake package (currently in rawhide and (soon) in F22 but eventually I’d like to have it in F20 and F21 too) so all packages that will be rebuilt after this will get the automatic Provides.

In the long-term we would like to try to get the script to upstream RPM so that other distributions can use this too. For now the script is available in cmake package distgit.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Help Making a Krita Master Class Possible!

Thu, 2015-03-19 08:32

The Brussels Blender User Group is currently holding a crowdfunding campaign to make it possible to organize four master classes about 3D and Digital art in Brussels. Four internationally renowned artists: David Revoy,  Sarah Laufer, François Gastaldo and François Grassard will teach in-depth about creating art using free graphics software: Krita and Blender.

David Revoy will be teaching Krita, with a focus on concept art and the challenges of digital painting — and he’ll introduce the new features we just released with Krita 2.9! Sarah Laufer has founded her own animation studio, regularly gives Blender courses in San Jose, and is now, of course, in the Netherlands for Project Gooseberry. She will focus on animating characters. François Gastaldo is an Open Shading Language expert and that’s the topic of his master class, while François Grassard from University Paris-8 has led the transition to free tools: Krita, Blender, Natron. He will talk about his experiences, but also about camera tracking, 3D integration and particle systems.

The organizers are committed to publishing videos afterwards. The Master Classes will be given in French, but there’s the intention to add subtitles in English.

The funding is meant to defray the travel expenses of the four speakers: if the campaign goes over budget, the surplus will be divided between the Krita Foundation and the Blender Foundation.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

How to persuade us that you're going to be a good GSoC student

Wed, 2015-03-18 13:32

It is that time of the year again, and people are applying for Google Summer of Code positions. It's great to see a big crowd of newcomers. This article explains what sort of students are welcome in GSoC from the point of view of Trojitá, a fast Qt IMAP e-mail client. I suspect that many other projects within KDE share my views, but it's best to ask them. Hopefully, this post will help students understand what we are looking for, and assist in deciding what project to work for.

Finding a motivation

As a mentor, my motivation in GSoC is pretty simple — I want to attract new contributors to the project I maintain. This means that I value long-term sustainability above fancy features. If you are going to apply with us, make sure that you actually want to stick around. What happens when GSoC terminates? What happens when GSoC terminates and the work you've been doing is not ready yet? Do you see yourself continuing the work you've done so far? Or is it going to become an abandonware, with some cash in your pocket being your only reward? Who is going to maintain the code which you worked hard to create?

Selecting an area of work

This is probably the most important aspect of your GSoC involvement. You're going to spend three months of full time activity on some project, a project you might have not heard about before. Why are you doing this — is it only about the money, or do you already have a connection to the project you've selected? Is the project trying to solve a problem that you find interesting? Would you use the results of that project even without the GSoC?

My experience shows that it's best to find a project which fills a niche that you find interesting. Do you have a digital camera, and do you think that a random photo editor's interface sucks? Work on that, make the interface better. Do you love listening to music? Maybe your favorite music player has some annoying bug that you could fix. Maybe you could add a feature to, say, synchronize the playlist with your cell phone (this is just an example, of course). Do you like 3D printing? Help improve an existing software for 3D printing, then. Are you a database buff? Is there something you find lacking in, e.g., PostgreSQL?

Either way, it is probably a good idea to select something which you need to use, or want to use for some reason. It's of course fine to e.g. spend your GSoC term working on an astronomy tool even though you haven't used one before, but unless you really like astronomy, then you should probably choose something else. In case of Trojitá, if you have been using GMail's web interface for the past five years and you think that it's the best thing since sliced bread, well, chances are that you won't enjoy working on a desktop e-mail client.

Pick something you like, something which you enjoy working with.

Making a proposal

An excellent idea is to make yourself known in advance. This does not happen by joining the IRC channel and saying "I want to work on GSoC", or mailing us to let us know about this. A much better way of getting involved is through showing your dedication.

Try to play with the application you are about to apply for. Do you see some annoying bug? Fix it! Does it work well? Use the application more; you will find bugs. Look at the project's bug tracker, maybe there are some issues which people are hitting. Do you think that you can fix it? Diving into bug fixing is an excellent opportunity to get yourself familiar with the project's code base, and to make sure that our mentors know the style and pace of your work.

Now that you have some familiarity with the code, maybe you can already see opportunities for work besides what's already described on the GSoC ideas wiki page. That's fine — the best proposals usually come from students who have found them on their own. The list of ideas is just that, a list of ideas, not an exhaustive cookbook. There's usually much more what can be done during the course of the GSoC. What would be most interesting area for you? How does it fit into the bigger picture?

After you've thought about the area to work on, now it's time to write your proposal. Start early, and make sure that you talk about your ideas with your prospective mentors before you spend three hours preparing a detailed roadmap. Define the goals that you want to achieve, and talk with your mentors about them. Make sure that the work fits well with the length and style of the GSoC.

And finally, be sure that you stay open and honest with your mentoring team. Remember, this is not a contest of writing a best project proposal. For me, GSoC is all about finding people who are interested in working on, say, Trojitá. What I'm looking for are honest, fair-behaving people who demonstrate willingness to learn new stuff. On top of that, I like to accept people with whom I have already worked. Hearing about you for the first time when I read your GSoC proposal is not a perfect way of introducing yourself. Make yourself known in advance, and show us how you can help us make our project better. Show us that you want to become a part of that "we".

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Kubuntu 15.04 Heating up

Wed, 2015-03-18 12:33

 

JR announces that we are getting close the the final beta for Kubuntu Vivid (soon to be 15.04). This is an exciting release, with big changes, including a transition from LightDM to SDDM; Upstart to sytemd; and Plasma 4 to 5. The call to action:

There’s still plenty on the bugs list many of them probably quite easy to fix if you fancy helping out.  Our To Do list has plenty to be done including several that could be classes as junior jobs if you’re wanting to get into free software such as making some new recommended applications for the Muon Discover banner or reviewing the ISO contents to see if anything can be removed and get the size down a little.  We’re in #kubuntu-devel on freenode if you want to say hi.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Kubuntu 15.04 Heating up

Wed, 2015-03-18 11:11

Kubuntu 15.04 development is in full swing and it’s looking like our 10th anniversary edition will be a classic.  We’re the first distribution to ship a stable version with Plasma 5, the desktop which is getting tech journalists excited.  My new favourite desktop they say.  A masterpiece  in the making they’re calling it.  The most exciting release in a long time they exclaim.

Kubuntu 15.04 Beta 1 is out and is working well for people wanting to try out Plasma 5.  We’ve deprecated the 14.10 Kubuntu-plasma5 packages, they were only ever tech preview and I’m afraid we don’t have the person-power to keep them updated, if you want Plasma 5 use the 15.04 Beta 1 for released versions or use Kubuntu CI images for Git versions.

Last week Ubuntu switched over to Systemd for boot system.  It’s complex and faffy but at least we have the same complex and faffy as the rest of the world.  There was a strange issue during the switchover where login manager SDDM suddenly disabled itself from starting.  If you get that just run:

systemctl enable sddm

With a new desktop comes the pleasingly satisfying work of integrating it, it’s not unlike when I first uploaded KDE 3 to Ubuntu.  This time though I’m better placed to put all the fixes upstream directly.  For example I’ve just setup gtkbreeze, a helper tool to set up GTK 2 and 3 themeing to mostly match Breeze.  But the icons don’t work, any help with that welcome.

Scarlett has updated Applications to 14.12.3.  Aaron H has updated the docs and the ubiquity slideshow. I’ve nudged the people and pulled the leavers to get KScreen released and print-manager KF5 happy (mostly thanks to Red Hat that one) and telepathy working nicely with Plasma 5 (Martin K gets bonus points there for the legacy presence applet). Package manager Muon now fits in so well with Plasma 5 it gets released with it thanks to Aleix. User Manager gets an update courtesy of Vishesh.  And Harald took time out from making all of KDE continuously integrate to port About Distro, you just can’t live without that one.

We’re still stuck on getting the new BlueDevil in, something in Ubuntu Touch needs ported to Bluez5 apparently.  Libreoffice is looking nice with Qt 4 Breeze theme but I’ve failed to get the breeze icons properly integrated, hopefully I’ll have a spare day soon for that.

There’s still plenty on the bugs list many of them probably quite easy to fix if you fancy helping out.  Our To Do list has plenty to be done including several that could be classes as junior jobs if you’re wanting to get into free software such as making some new recommended applications for the Muon Discover banner or reviewing the ISO contents to see if anything can be removed and get the size down a little.  We’re in #kubuntu-devel on freenode if you want to say hi.

 

 

by
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Farewell Pairs

Wed, 2015-03-18 05:38

Last summer I worked on porting Pairs to KDE Framework 5, but since a lot of code was really depending on KDE 4 we needed to rewrite 60% of the code. Of course my two week of vacation weren't enough for the job. I also had some simple Google Codein tasks to help me going, and then last month KDE-Edu ask me to join forces with GCompris and deprecate Pairs.

GCompris is an old project that recently became part of the KDE family and in short is a collection of educational programs. In this collection there is also a program similar to Pairs.

When I first read the email where KDE-Edu asked to deprecate Pairs I was shocked. I didn't want to. What about the new program GCompris ... ( G for sure is for Gnome, no way!).
I had a look at the GCompris website and I found so many things that their "Pairs" miss.
I really didn't like the Idea.

But then I calm down and I told myself. You always hate one thing of free software:
There always seems to be two solutions for the same problem. Some example:

KDE  vs Gnome
Netbeans  vs Eclipse
Mysql vs Postgresql
Gimp vs Krita
LibreOffice vs Openoffice
VMware vs Busybox

and for sure you can name many others.  I agree that some of them have a company behind that want to keep the project going. But others are simple divided just because of taste, or historic reason.
Now :

Imagine all the developer
sharing all the code

OK was a bit cheesy, but the meaning is clear.
What if the File management form Netbeans would join the code editor feature of Eclipse, that would be the most versatile and fast editor in the world.
What if all the scripting capability of Gimp would go right into Krita, would be the best graphic editor around.
And so on.

So I asked myself what do you want to do with Pairs? Your community is asking you to put your skills and time into another project, because at the end it makes more sense to join forces, work in team than pursue your own interest.
And the community i,s at the end, what counts, not "my" program. In fact there so many people in the KDE community that were responsible for having Pairs deliver to your home (I am sure you are using it every day for your kids ;) )
At this point the decision was easy. I contacted the maintainer of GCompris and I said I wanted to join.
Don't get me wrong I am still sad for deprecating Pairs but it is a good decision for the community best interest.
So the last Kubuntu that will have Pairs, is the last that support KDE 4 application, and I have been told is Kubuntu 16.04.

I would like to hear some feedback on Pairs so I can bring even your comments over to the GCompris development

So in the end I say my  welcome to GCompris and my farewell to Pairs.



Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Scripting addicts, check the new kwallet-query tool!

Tue, 2015-03-17 15:56

This weekend I created a new kwallet tool, named kwallet-query. It now lives in playground/utils for you to try it up. Just issue “kwallet-query –help” after building it to see the available options.

qwallet-query sports two modes: list mode and read value mode. You should specify the mode when invoking the tool, along with the wallet name you want the tool to read. I’d also be glad to hear back from you as to what this tool should provide in addition to this. This initial version will work on KF5-based systems. Should I also add support for the legacy KDE4 wallet?

You may find this tool handy when reading the wallet from other places. For instance, I wanted to create this tool in order to get my passwords from my wallet by using dmenu on my I3WM-enabled KDE session.

For those interested about the dmenu integration thing, have a look at this: . It’s a little script that uses the new kwallet-query tool in two phases. First, it’ll send the list of folders you have in the Passwords section of the wallet. It’ll feed the list to dmenu who’ll invite you to select the folder you want to read. A second invocation will read the folder you choose from the wallet and once again will feed dmenu to let you choose one entry, corresponding to one line in the password stored in the kwallet. The selected entry will be pu into the clipboard, so you’ll only have to press Shift+Insert into the application where you where, without further workflow break. No more kwalletmanager visiting to copy/paste your secrets items!

Once again, I’m looking forward for your feeback (bug reports or even comments here). I plan to get this tool through the kdereview process about one month from now.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

ownCloud Client 1.8.0 Released

Tue, 2015-03-17 09:51

Today, we’re happy to release the best ownCloud Desktop Client ever to our community and users! It is ownCloud Client 1.8.0 and it will push syncing with ownCloud to a new level of performance, stability and convenience.

The Share Dialog

This release brings a new integration into the operating system file manager. With 1.8.0, there is a new context menu that opens a dialog to allow the user to create a public link on a synced file. This link can be forwarded to other users who get access to the file via ownCloud.

Also the clients behavior when syncing files that are opened by other applications on Windows has greatly been improved. The problems with file locking some users saw for example with MS office apps were fixed.

Another area of improvements is again performance. With latest ownCloud servers, the client uses even more parallized requests, now for all kind of operations. Depending on the synced data structure, this can make a huge difference.

All the other changes, improvements and bug-fixes are too hard to count. Finally, this release received around 700 git commits compared to the previous release.

All this is only possible with the powerful and awesome community of ownClouders. We received a lot of very good contributions through the GitHub tracker, which helped us to nail down a lot of issues and improved the client tremendously.

But this time we’d like to specifically point out the code contributions of Alfie “Azelphur” Day and Roeland Jago Douma who contributed significant code bits to the sharing dialog on the client and also some server code.

A great thanks goes out to all of you who helped with this release. It was a great experience again and it is big fun working with you!

We hope you enjoy 1.8.0! Get it from https://owncloud.org/install/#desktop


Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Now accepting Google Summer of Code student applications

Tue, 2015-03-17 05:52

Attention prospective Google Summer of Code students: the student applications window has begun.

If you haven’t contacted the relevant KDE subproject yet (including umbrella projects Kubuntu and Calamares) to submit your proposal for review, it is high time to do so. Take a look at our Google Summer of Code project ideas page, pick one or more of our exciting project ideas, dazzle us with your proposal and hack your way to ultimate glory this summer! A nice paycheck is also part of the deal.

If you have already received feedback and you feel your proposal is in good shape, we encourage you to officially submit it now to Google Melange.

Submitting early means your proposal might get more attention, and you will be able to edit it until the end of the student applications period. The deadline for student applications is March 27, 2015.

Mentors: interest from prospective students has been significant, and we’ll need to match those students with mentors. Offering more mentors might increase the number of student slots we get from Google, so if you are an established KDE developer and you are interested in giving a helping hand with Google Summer of Code, please sign up to be a mentor on Google Melange as soon as possible.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Buzz Buzz!

Mon, 2015-03-16 13:02

With the Sprint behind us and the Freeze coming up next month, the VDG has made it’s agenda for the coming weeks, and I figured I’d share some highlights I’m working on, and a couple I’m personally looking forward to.

Wallpapers

Andreas is doing a fantastic wallpaper contest which I hope many of you will participate in; the goal is to get wallpapers for weather-based wallpapers, and to also get several new wallpapers into circulation. It doesn’t have to be weather wallpapers – if you have a wonderful high-resolution graphic, submit it!

In addition to pulling in community work, we’re going to change up the release cycle for new wallpapers: Previously, wallpapers were updated every second version, but now we will add a new wallpaper for every release of Plasma!

Avatars

The current crop of standard avatars have aged gracefully, but we’re looking to refresh them. We have a new crop of avatars based on history-changing individuals and fairy-tale children. Eventually we will expand the set to include a range of personalities.

Credit for the design goes to Jens Reutersberg who created the fantastic VDG profile pictures.

Decorations

We may be looking forward to a new alternate decoration; originally based on Breeze and the result of a first-time hack gone too far, “Chroma” may be appearing! Somewhere! Where it shows up all depends on my laziness and incompetence. I assure you I am only mostly lazy and incompetent.

There’s a few things that need to be done with it, mostly in regards to properly breaking it out from Breeze to be it’s own decoration, and learning to properly submit it.

Akademy

Several VDG members are looking to show up at Akademy, so if you’re looking to hear an awesome talk or two there will be some design talks in the future. I won’t go spoilertastic, but I’m looking forward to it, or dying trying to get there – you should be to!


Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Vivid, with Plasma 5 is dedoimedo’s new favorite desktop

Mon, 2015-03-16 06:59

http://www.ocsmag.com/2015/03/13/plasma-is-my-new-favorite-desktop/

“But the thing is, the more I’m using it, the more I’m loving it.”

“Seriously, tell me, how can you not like Plasma. It looks the part, it acts professionally, everything is simple and intuitive, and even when placed on a beta version of an upcoming Kubuntu release, it’s still reasonably good for daily use. Sure, you should not test this on production systems, but imagine the possibilities. Taste the class. Soon, you’ll be able to properly enjoy Plasma.”

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets